Public engagement: MayFestival '18

Rzewuska, M. (Contributor)

Activity: Talk, presentation, public lecture, public engagement, outreach and knowledge exchangePublic Lecture/debate/seminar

Activity

'A trial at sea' for primary school children (9-12 years)

In a distant past, in the 18th century, a tragic disease was affecting sailors going in the sea and looking for new land. Doctors did not know what it was or how to treat it. Until James Lind, one of the best Scottish doctors that ever lived, came along. He decided an investigation had to be done in order to help save the sailors! He tested different treatments, some of them really controversial (like sulfuric acid!!), to try and find out the solution to this problem. In order to do that, he chose sailor’s treatments by chance. He later found this was the best way to run his investigation!
Doctor Lind eventually found a cure and sailors were finally able to travel disease-free!
Come along to our play and become a sailor in the 18th century. Find out all about Dr James Lind and his investigations in the sea.

Description

Target audience of the activity/event: The University of Aberdeen’s annual May Festival predominantly attracts families and local people to a range of free events and activities across campus that are ticketed, as well as drop-in. The festival usually attracts in excess of 1000 people per day. Areas covered include: sciences, literature, arts, archaeology, etc. and the programme offers indoor/outdoor, stood/seated options, all day catering, etc. with accessibility for all. The festival is widely advertised on local radio/in newspapers/etc. to attract diverse audiences and is supported by a range of local sponsors, including third sector and private companies.

Expected impact: Events are run as part of the University's programme of festivals, which brings our academic community together with wider society for the mutual benefit of both. Impacts for participants include: greater knowledge of what we do at the Health Services Research Unit; understanding of randomisation and why we use it in clinical trials; and opportunities to get involved in our research/careers in health services research. Impacts for researchers include: immediate, non-academic feedback on our work, priority areas, concerns, etc.; greater understanding of barriers/facilitators to study recruitment potentially attributable to randomisation (vs. choice); opportunities to develop new networks of people we can invite to be involved in studies.
Period22 May 201823 May 2018
Event titleMay Festival 2018
Event typeOther
LocationAberdeen , United Kingdom
Degree of RecognitionLocal