‘Why the Good Friday Agreement is on life support – and why hope still remains’

Press/Media: Other

Description

The central support beams of the Good Friday Agreement — power-sharing and Europeanisation — have become so weakened that its sustainability is now under threat, explains John Nagle. But there is still hope for recovery, and it rests with Northern Ireland’s liberal younger generation.

Dear Jeffrey,

 

Thank you for offering to take part in the mental health video project.

 

There is the opportunity to take part individually or in a small group discussion with other staff. If you haven’t already please let me know which you prefer.

 

Filming will take place centrally and last around an hour between 9.30 and 4, if your preference is to be filmed individually please indicate what time is suitable between 9.30 and 11.30 or 2 and 4. The group filming will take place between 11.30 and 1.00.

 

I am looking forward to meeting you don’t hesitate to let me know if you have any questions. (I am on leave from today returning on Monday 2nd July)

 

Best Wishes,

Jacquie

 

 

 

Jacqueline Nicholson RNMH, MSc, MBPsS.

Mental Health Adviser

 

Student Advice and Support Office

Students’ Union Building

Elphinstone Road

Aberdeen  AB24 3TU

Scotland

United Kingdom

 

Period18 Jun 2018

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • Title‘Why the Good Friday Agreement is on life support – and why hope still remains’
    Media name/outletLSE: British Politics and Policy
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date18/06/18
    DescriptionThe central support beams of the Good Friday Agreement — power-sharing and Europeanisation — have become so weakened that its sustainability is now under threat, explains John Nagle. But there is still hope for recovery, and it rests with Northern Ireland’s liberal younger generation.
    URLblogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/why-the-good-friday-agreement-is-on-life/
    PersonsJohn Michael Nagle