A 12th-century 'Bowl-fired' Grain Drying Kiln at Druminnor Castle, Aberdeenshire. Implications for Social Change, Agricultural Productivity and Landscape Development in North-east Scotland

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Abstract

The discovery of a medieval 'bowl-fired' grain-drying kiln during excavations at Druminnor Castle has implications for how we view the management of agricultural practices in the north-east of Scotland during the 12th century. Landscape study of the Forbes Estate has suggested the former existence of two large open fields associated with the castle. Technological change associated with the construction of a kiln may have coincided with a parallel development in field layout. The 12th-century date of the kiln might suggest a similar date for the fields. These changes occurred within a 'native' lordship prior to a later influx of Anglo-Norman influence in the area.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages32
JournalStudia Celtica
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018

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