A common language to assess allergic rhinitis control: results from a survey conducted during EAACI 2013 Congress

Peter W Hellings, Antonella Muraro, Wytske Fokkens, Joaquim Mullol, Claus Bachert, G Walter Canonica, David Price, Nikos Papadopoulos, Glenis Scadding, Gerd Rasp, Pascal Demoly, Ruth Murray, Jean Bousquet

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The concept of control is gaining importance in the field of allergic rhinitis (AR), with a visual analogue scale (VAS) score being a validated, easy and attractive tool to evaluate AR symptom control. The doctors' perception of a VAS score as a good tool for evaluating AR symptom control is unknown, as is the level of AR control perceived by physicians who treat patients.

METHODS: 307 voluntarily selected physicians attending the annual (2013) European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) meeting completed a digital survey. Delegates were asked to (1) estimate how many AR patients/week they saw during the season, (2) estimate the proportion of patients they considered to have well-, partly- and un-controlled AR, (3) communicate how they gauged this control and (4) assess how useful they would find a VAS as a method of gauging control. 257 questionnaires were filled out completely and analysed.

RESULTS: EAACI delegates reported seeing 46.8 [standard deviation (SD) 68.5] AR patients/week during the season. They estimated that 38.7 % (SD 24.0), 34.2 % (SD 20.2) and 20.0 % (SD 16.34) of their AR patients had well-controlled (no AR symptoms), partly-controlled (some AR symptoms), or un-controlled-(moderate/severe AR symptoms) disease despite taking medication [remainder unknown (7.1 %)]. However, AR control was assessed in many ways, including symptom severity (74 %), frequency of day- and night-time symptoms (67 %), activity impairment (57 %), respiratory function monitoring (nasal and/or lung function; 40 %) and incidence of AR exacerbations (50 %). 91 % of delegates felt a simple VAS would be a useful tool to gauge AR symptom control.

CONCLUSIONS: A substantial portion of patients with AR are perceived as having uncontrolled or partly controlled disease even when treated. A simple VAS score is considered a useful tool to monitor AR control.

Original languageEnglish
Article number36
JournalClinical and Translational Allergy
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Oct 2015

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Allergy and Immunology
Language
Visual Analog Scale
Allergic Rhinitis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Physicians
Nose

Keywords

  • allergic rhinitis
  • control
  • digital
  • survey
  • visual analogue scale
  • VAS

Cite this

A common language to assess allergic rhinitis control : results from a survey conducted during EAACI 2013 Congress. / Hellings, Peter W; Muraro, Antonella; Fokkens, Wytske; Mullol, Joaquim; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, G Walter; Price, David; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Scadding, Glenis; Rasp, Gerd; Demoly, Pascal; Murray, Ruth; Bousquet, Jean.

In: Clinical and Translational Allergy, Vol. 5, 36, 27.10.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hellings, PW, Muraro, A, Fokkens, W, Mullol, J, Bachert, C, Canonica, GW, Price, D, Papadopoulos, N, Scadding, G, Rasp, G, Demoly, P, Murray, R & Bousquet, J 2015, 'A common language to assess allergic rhinitis control: results from a survey conducted during EAACI 2013 Congress', Clinical and Translational Allergy, vol. 5, 36. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13601-015-0080-9
Hellings, Peter W ; Muraro, Antonella ; Fokkens, Wytske ; Mullol, Joaquim ; Bachert, Claus ; Canonica, G Walter ; Price, David ; Papadopoulos, Nikos ; Scadding, Glenis ; Rasp, Gerd ; Demoly, Pascal ; Murray, Ruth ; Bousquet, Jean. / A common language to assess allergic rhinitis control : results from a survey conducted during EAACI 2013 Congress. In: Clinical and Translational Allergy. 2015 ; Vol. 5.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: The concept of control is gaining importance in the field of allergic rhinitis (AR), with a visual analogue scale (VAS) score being a validated, easy and attractive tool to evaluate AR symptom control. The doctors' perception of a VAS score as a good tool for evaluating AR symptom control is unknown, as is the level of AR control perceived by physicians who treat patients.METHODS: 307 voluntarily selected physicians attending the annual (2013) European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) meeting completed a digital survey. Delegates were asked to (1) estimate how many AR patients/week they saw during the season, (2) estimate the proportion of patients they considered to have well-, partly- and un-controlled AR, (3) communicate how they gauged this control and (4) assess how useful they would find a VAS as a method of gauging control. 257 questionnaires were filled out completely and analysed.RESULTS: EAACI delegates reported seeing 46.8 [standard deviation (SD) 68.5] AR patients/week during the season. They estimated that 38.7 {\%} (SD 24.0), 34.2 {\%} (SD 20.2) and 20.0 {\%} (SD 16.34) of their AR patients had well-controlled (no AR symptoms), partly-controlled (some AR symptoms), or un-controlled-(moderate/severe AR symptoms) disease despite taking medication [remainder unknown (7.1 {\%})]. However, AR control was assessed in many ways, including symptom severity (74 {\%}), frequency of day- and night-time symptoms (67 {\%}), activity impairment (57 {\%}), respiratory function monitoring (nasal and/or lung function; 40 {\%}) and incidence of AR exacerbations (50 {\%}). 91 {\%} of delegates felt a simple VAS would be a useful tool to gauge AR symptom control.CONCLUSIONS: A substantial portion of patients with AR are perceived as having uncontrolled or partly controlled disease even when treated. A simple VAS score is considered a useful tool to monitor AR control.",
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T2 - results from a survey conducted during EAACI 2013 Congress

AU - Hellings, Peter W

AU - Muraro, Antonella

AU - Fokkens, Wytske

AU - Mullol, Joaquim

AU - Bachert, Claus

AU - Canonica, G Walter

AU - Price, David

AU - Papadopoulos, Nikos

AU - Scadding, Glenis

AU - Rasp, Gerd

AU - Demoly, Pascal

AU - Murray, Ruth

AU - Bousquet, Jean

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N2 - BACKGROUND: The concept of control is gaining importance in the field of allergic rhinitis (AR), with a visual analogue scale (VAS) score being a validated, easy and attractive tool to evaluate AR symptom control. The doctors' perception of a VAS score as a good tool for evaluating AR symptom control is unknown, as is the level of AR control perceived by physicians who treat patients.METHODS: 307 voluntarily selected physicians attending the annual (2013) European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) meeting completed a digital survey. Delegates were asked to (1) estimate how many AR patients/week they saw during the season, (2) estimate the proportion of patients they considered to have well-, partly- and un-controlled AR, (3) communicate how they gauged this control and (4) assess how useful they would find a VAS as a method of gauging control. 257 questionnaires were filled out completely and analysed.RESULTS: EAACI delegates reported seeing 46.8 [standard deviation (SD) 68.5] AR patients/week during the season. They estimated that 38.7 % (SD 24.0), 34.2 % (SD 20.2) and 20.0 % (SD 16.34) of their AR patients had well-controlled (no AR symptoms), partly-controlled (some AR symptoms), or un-controlled-(moderate/severe AR symptoms) disease despite taking medication [remainder unknown (7.1 %)]. However, AR control was assessed in many ways, including symptom severity (74 %), frequency of day- and night-time symptoms (67 %), activity impairment (57 %), respiratory function monitoring (nasal and/or lung function; 40 %) and incidence of AR exacerbations (50 %). 91 % of delegates felt a simple VAS would be a useful tool to gauge AR symptom control.CONCLUSIONS: A substantial portion of patients with AR are perceived as having uncontrolled or partly controlled disease even when treated. A simple VAS score is considered a useful tool to monitor AR control.

AB - BACKGROUND: The concept of control is gaining importance in the field of allergic rhinitis (AR), with a visual analogue scale (VAS) score being a validated, easy and attractive tool to evaluate AR symptom control. The doctors' perception of a VAS score as a good tool for evaluating AR symptom control is unknown, as is the level of AR control perceived by physicians who treat patients.METHODS: 307 voluntarily selected physicians attending the annual (2013) European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) meeting completed a digital survey. Delegates were asked to (1) estimate how many AR patients/week they saw during the season, (2) estimate the proportion of patients they considered to have well-, partly- and un-controlled AR, (3) communicate how they gauged this control and (4) assess how useful they would find a VAS as a method of gauging control. 257 questionnaires were filled out completely and analysed.RESULTS: EAACI delegates reported seeing 46.8 [standard deviation (SD) 68.5] AR patients/week during the season. They estimated that 38.7 % (SD 24.0), 34.2 % (SD 20.2) and 20.0 % (SD 16.34) of their AR patients had well-controlled (no AR symptoms), partly-controlled (some AR symptoms), or un-controlled-(moderate/severe AR symptoms) disease despite taking medication [remainder unknown (7.1 %)]. However, AR control was assessed in many ways, including symptom severity (74 %), frequency of day- and night-time symptoms (67 %), activity impairment (57 %), respiratory function monitoring (nasal and/or lung function; 40 %) and incidence of AR exacerbations (50 %). 91 % of delegates felt a simple VAS would be a useful tool to gauge AR symptom control.CONCLUSIONS: A substantial portion of patients with AR are perceived as having uncontrolled or partly controlled disease even when treated. A simple VAS score is considered a useful tool to monitor AR control.

KW - allergic rhinitis

KW - control

KW - digital

KW - survey

KW - visual analogue scale

KW - VAS

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DO - 10.1186/s13601-015-0080-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 26509001

VL - 5

JO - Clinical and Translational Allergy

JF - Clinical and Translational Allergy

SN - 2045-7022

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