A comparison of preprepared commercial infant feeding meals with home-cooked recipes

Sharon A. Carstairs (Corresponding Author), Leone C. A. Craig, Debbi Marais, Ourania E Bora, Kirsty Kiezebrink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Objectives To compare the cost, nutritional and food variety contents of commercial meals and published infant and young child feeding (IYCF) home-cooked recipes, and to compare nutritional contents to age-specific recommendations.
Design Cross-sectional study.
Setting Full range of pre-prepared main-meals available within the UK market. Main meal recipes identified from a survey of Amazon’s top 20 bestsellers and IYCF cookbooks available from local libraries.
Samples 278 commercial IYCF savoury meals from UK market and 408 home-cooked recipes from bestselling IYCF published cookbooks.
Main Outcome Measures Cost and nutritional content per 100g and food variety per meal for both commercial meals and home-cooked recipes.
Results Commercial products provided more ‘vegetable’ variety per meal (median=3.0; r=-0.33) than home-cooked recipes (2.0). Recipes provided 26% more energy and 44% more protein and total fat compared to commercial products (r=-0.40, -0.31, -0.40 respectively) whilst costing less (£0.33/100g and £0.68/100g respectively). The majority of commercial products (65%) met energy density recommendations but 50% of home-cooked recipes exceeded the maximum range.
Conclusions The majority of commercial meals provided an energy dense meal with greater vegetable variety per meal to their home-cooked counterparts. Home-cooked recipes provided a cheaper meal option however the majority exceeded recommendations for energy and fats.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1037-1042
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood
Volume101
Issue number11
Early online date19 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016

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Meals
Vegetables
Fats
Satureja
Costs and Cost Analysis
Food
Libraries
Cross-Sectional Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • infant feeding
  • commercial foods
  • home-cooked
  • food variety
  • child feeding

Cite this

A comparison of preprepared commercial infant feeding meals with home-cooked recipes. / Carstairs, Sharon A. (Corresponding Author); Craig, Leone C. A.; Marais, Debbi; Bora, Ourania E; Kiezebrink, Kirsty.

In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, Vol. 101, No. 11, 11.2016, p. 1037-1042.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives To compare the cost, nutritional and food variety contents of commercial meals and published infant and young child feeding (IYCF) home-cooked recipes, and to compare nutritional contents to age-specific recommendations.Design Cross-sectional study.Setting Full range of pre-prepared main-meals available within the UK market. Main meal recipes identified from a survey of Amazon’s top 20 bestsellers and IYCF cookbooks available from local libraries.Samples 278 commercial IYCF savoury meals from UK market and 408 home-cooked recipes from bestselling IYCF published cookbooks.Main Outcome Measures Cost and nutritional content per 100g and food variety per meal for both commercial meals and home-cooked recipes.Results Commercial products provided more ‘vegetable’ variety per meal (median=3.0; r=-0.33) than home-cooked recipes (2.0). Recipes provided 26{\%} more energy and 44{\%} more protein and total fat compared to commercial products (r=-0.40, -0.31, -0.40 respectively) whilst costing less (£0.33/100g and £0.68/100g respectively). The majority of commercial products (65{\%}) met energy density recommendations but 50{\%} of home-cooked recipes exceeded the maximum range. Conclusions The majority of commercial meals provided an energy dense meal with greater vegetable variety per meal to their home-cooked counterparts. Home-cooked recipes provided a cheaper meal option however the majority exceeded recommendations for energy and fats.",
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note = "Funding This study was funded by the Seafish Authority and Interface Food and Drink Scotland as part of a PhD scholarship for SAC. This work was supported by The Scottish Government’s Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services (RESAS) division (LCAC grant).",
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N2 - Objectives To compare the cost, nutritional and food variety contents of commercial meals and published infant and young child feeding (IYCF) home-cooked recipes, and to compare nutritional contents to age-specific recommendations.Design Cross-sectional study.Setting Full range of pre-prepared main-meals available within the UK market. Main meal recipes identified from a survey of Amazon’s top 20 bestsellers and IYCF cookbooks available from local libraries.Samples 278 commercial IYCF savoury meals from UK market and 408 home-cooked recipes from bestselling IYCF published cookbooks.Main Outcome Measures Cost and nutritional content per 100g and food variety per meal for both commercial meals and home-cooked recipes.Results Commercial products provided more ‘vegetable’ variety per meal (median=3.0; r=-0.33) than home-cooked recipes (2.0). Recipes provided 26% more energy and 44% more protein and total fat compared to commercial products (r=-0.40, -0.31, -0.40 respectively) whilst costing less (£0.33/100g and £0.68/100g respectively). The majority of commercial products (65%) met energy density recommendations but 50% of home-cooked recipes exceeded the maximum range. Conclusions The majority of commercial meals provided an energy dense meal with greater vegetable variety per meal to their home-cooked counterparts. Home-cooked recipes provided a cheaper meal option however the majority exceeded recommendations for energy and fats.

AB - Objectives To compare the cost, nutritional and food variety contents of commercial meals and published infant and young child feeding (IYCF) home-cooked recipes, and to compare nutritional contents to age-specific recommendations.Design Cross-sectional study.Setting Full range of pre-prepared main-meals available within the UK market. Main meal recipes identified from a survey of Amazon’s top 20 bestsellers and IYCF cookbooks available from local libraries.Samples 278 commercial IYCF savoury meals from UK market and 408 home-cooked recipes from bestselling IYCF published cookbooks.Main Outcome Measures Cost and nutritional content per 100g and food variety per meal for both commercial meals and home-cooked recipes.Results Commercial products provided more ‘vegetable’ variety per meal (median=3.0; r=-0.33) than home-cooked recipes (2.0). Recipes provided 26% more energy and 44% more protein and total fat compared to commercial products (r=-0.40, -0.31, -0.40 respectively) whilst costing less (£0.33/100g and £0.68/100g respectively). The majority of commercial products (65%) met energy density recommendations but 50% of home-cooked recipes exceeded the maximum range. Conclusions The majority of commercial meals provided an energy dense meal with greater vegetable variety per meal to their home-cooked counterparts. Home-cooked recipes provided a cheaper meal option however the majority exceeded recommendations for energy and fats.

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