A favourite Scotch measure: the relationship between a group of Scottish solo dances and the tune ‘The Flowers of Edinburgh’

Mats Melin

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Abstract

Certain Scottish melodies seem to have inspired the dancing masters of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Scotland to devise a diverse set of dances designed to be performed to particular tunes. ‘The Flowers of Edinburgh’, a 4/4 Scotch measure, has inspired a number of soft- and hard-shoe solo dances taking their names from the tune, as well as a Scottish country dance. This article focuses on how the creative processes of various dance teachers have left us with three or four dances with varied movement segmentation patterns, and several versions of these dances in relation to versions of the same tune. My aim is to
illustrate the diversity of choreographic ideas and motifs in relation to a single tune, but also to examine whether we are dealing with discrete dances from different sources, or rather,
similar versions of a smaller, shared repertoire of nineteenth-century dances.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationÓn gCos go Cluas
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Dancing to Listening
EditorsLiz Doherty, Fintan Vallely
PublisherAberdeen University Press
Chapter21
Pages177-187
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)978-1-85752-073-6
Publication statusPublished - 2019
EventNorth Atlantic Fiddle Convention Conference - Northern Ireland, Derry/Londonderry, United Kingdom
Duration: 27 Jun 20121 Jul 2012

Publication series

NameFiddle and Dance Studies from around the North Atlantic 5

Conference

ConferenceNorth Atlantic Fiddle Convention Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityDerry/Londonderry
Period27/06/121/07/12

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  • Cite this

    Melin, M. (2019). A favourite Scotch measure: the relationship between a group of Scottish solo dances and the tune ‘The Flowers of Edinburgh’ . In L. Doherty, & F. Vallely (Eds.), Ón gCos go Cluas: From Dancing to Listening (pp. 177-187 ). (Fiddle and Dance Studies from around the North Atlantic 5). Aberdeen University Press.