A Healthy Hybrid: The Technological Dynamism of Minority State-Owned Firms in China

Jing Cai, A. Tylecote

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since its economic reform began in 1979 China's economy has grown rapidly but its dynamism has not been shared by the state-owned enterprises (SOEs) at its core. Although some progress has been made, a large proportion of SOEs remain inefficient and uncompetitive, failing to exploit their advantages in scale, experience and resources. In contrast there has been rapid growth first of the collective anti township enterprises, and then of the private sector, now the largest ownership type. However, private businesses continue to be handicapped by poor access to finance and other resources. These have however been made freely available to firms with only a minority state shareholding and otherwise owned by private shareholders and employees. This paper, focussing on the telecoms manufacturing sector, compares minority-state-owned hybrids favourably with other ownership types and argues that in the Chinese setting they can and should play a key role infuture development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-277
Number of pages20
JournalTechnology Analysis & Strategic Management
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005

Cite this

A Healthy Hybrid: The Technological Dynamism of Minority State-Owned Firms in China. / Cai, Jing; Tylecote, A.

In: Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, Vol. 17, No. 3, 09.2005, p. 257-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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