A ladder logic model to inform the design of incentive interventions for breastfeeding

Pat Hoddinott, Heather Morgan, Gill Thomson, Nicola Crossland, Stephan Dombrowski

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstract

Abstract

Breastfeeding is a socially patterned behaviour, which has consequences for health inequalities. Breastfeeding prevalence in the UK has not changed over the last 15 years. As a result many are advocating new approaches rather than more of the same. One such approach is to offer women incentives. Systematic review evidence on the effectiveness of incentives for improving breastfeeding outcomes is inconclusive (Morgan et al.2015). General public acceptability of financial incentives is mixed, a free breast pump worth £40 was more acceptable than shopping vouchers (Hoddinott et al.2014) and unintended consequences may occur for relationships (Thomson et al. 2014). One aim of our study was to improve understanding of the mechanisms of action of financial incentives for breastfeeding in pregnancy, with a focus on health inequalities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65
Number of pages2
JournalMaternal and Child Nutrition
Volume11
Issue numberSupplement S2
Early online date10 Dec 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015

Fingerprint

Breast Feeding
Motivation
Health
Breast
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Breastfeeding
  • incentive interventions

Cite this

A ladder logic model to inform the design of incentive interventions for breastfeeding. / Hoddinott, Pat; Morgan, Heather; Thomson, Gill; Crossland, Nicola; Dombrowski, Stephan.

In: Maternal and Child Nutrition, Vol. 11, No. Supplement S2, 12.2015, p. 65.

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstract

Hoddinott, Pat ; Morgan, Heather ; Thomson, Gill ; Crossland, Nicola ; Dombrowski, Stephan. / A ladder logic model to inform the design of incentive interventions for breastfeeding. In: Maternal and Child Nutrition. 2015 ; Vol. 11, No. Supplement S2. pp. 65.
@article{81b1b042d7ad44689d4391c1e8f21e8a,
title = "A ladder logic model to inform the design of incentive interventions for breastfeeding",
abstract = "Breastfeeding is a socially patterned behaviour, which has consequences for health inequalities. Breastfeeding prevalence in the UK has not changed over the last 15 years. As a result many are advocating new approaches rather than more of the same. One such approach is to offer women incentives. Systematic review evidence on the effectiveness of incentives for improving breastfeeding outcomes is inconclusive (Morgan et al.2015). General public acceptability of financial incentives is mixed, a free breast pump worth £40 was more acceptable than shopping vouchers (Hoddinott et al.2014) and unintended consequences may occur for relationships (Thomson et al. 2014). One aim of our study was to improve understanding of the mechanisms of action of financial incentives for breastfeeding in pregnancy, with a focus on health inequalities.",
keywords = "Breastfeeding, incentive interventions",
author = "Pat Hoddinott and Heather Morgan and Gill Thomson and Nicola Crossland and Stephan Dombrowski",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1111/mcn.12238",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "65",
journal = "Maternal and Child Nutrition",
issn = "1740-8695",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "Supplement S2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A ladder logic model to inform the design of incentive interventions for breastfeeding

AU - Hoddinott, Pat

AU - Morgan, Heather

AU - Thomson, Gill

AU - Crossland, Nicola

AU - Dombrowski, Stephan

PY - 2015/12

Y1 - 2015/12

N2 - Breastfeeding is a socially patterned behaviour, which has consequences for health inequalities. Breastfeeding prevalence in the UK has not changed over the last 15 years. As a result many are advocating new approaches rather than more of the same. One such approach is to offer women incentives. Systematic review evidence on the effectiveness of incentives for improving breastfeeding outcomes is inconclusive (Morgan et al.2015). General public acceptability of financial incentives is mixed, a free breast pump worth £40 was more acceptable than shopping vouchers (Hoddinott et al.2014) and unintended consequences may occur for relationships (Thomson et al. 2014). One aim of our study was to improve understanding of the mechanisms of action of financial incentives for breastfeeding in pregnancy, with a focus on health inequalities.

AB - Breastfeeding is a socially patterned behaviour, which has consequences for health inequalities. Breastfeeding prevalence in the UK has not changed over the last 15 years. As a result many are advocating new approaches rather than more of the same. One such approach is to offer women incentives. Systematic review evidence on the effectiveness of incentives for improving breastfeeding outcomes is inconclusive (Morgan et al.2015). General public acceptability of financial incentives is mixed, a free breast pump worth £40 was more acceptable than shopping vouchers (Hoddinott et al.2014) and unintended consequences may occur for relationships (Thomson et al. 2014). One aim of our study was to improve understanding of the mechanisms of action of financial incentives for breastfeeding in pregnancy, with a focus on health inequalities.

KW - Breastfeeding

KW - incentive interventions

U2 - 10.1111/mcn.12238

DO - 10.1111/mcn.12238

M3 - Abstract

VL - 11

SP - 65

JO - Maternal and Child Nutrition

JF - Maternal and Child Nutrition

SN - 1740-8695

IS - Supplement S2

ER -