A mobile phone intervention to reduce binge drinking among disadvantaged men

study protocol for a randomised controlled cost-effectiveness trial

Iain K Crombie, Linda Irvine, Brian Williams, Falko F Sniehotta, Dennis Petrie, Josie MM Evans, Carol Emslie, Claire Jones, Ian W Ricketts, Gerry Humphris, John Norrie, Peter Rice, Peter W Slane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Socially disadvantaged men are at a substantially higher risk of developing alcohol-related problems. The frequency of heavy drinking in a single session is high among disadvantaged men. Brief alcohol interventions were developed for, and are usually delivered in, healthcare settings. The group who binge drink most frequently, young to middle-aged disadvantaged men, have less contact with health services and there is a need for an alternative method of intervention delivery. Text messaging has been used successfully to modify other adverse health behaviours. This study will test whether text messages can reduce the frequency of binge drinking by disadvantaged men.

METHODS/DESIGN: Disadvantaged men aged 25 to 44 years who drank >8 units of alcohol at least twice in the preceding month will be recruited from the community. Two recruitment strategies will be used: contacting men listed in primary care registers, and a community outreach method (time-space sampling). The intended sample of 798 men will be randomised to intervention or control, stratifying by recruitment method. The intervention group will receive a series of text messages designed to reduce the frequency of binge drinking through the formation of specific action plans. The control group will receive behaviourally neutral text messages intended to promote retention in the study. The primary outcome measure is the proportion of men consuming >8 units on at least three occasions in the previous 30 days. Secondary outcomes include total alcohol consumption and the frequency of consuming more than 16 units of alcohol in one session in the previous month. Process measures, developed during a previous feasibility study, will monitor engagement with the key behaviour change components of the intervention. The study will incorporate an economic evaluation comparing the costs of recruitment and intervention delivery with the benefits of reduced alcohol-related harm.

DISCUSSION: This study will assess the effectiveness of a brief intervention, delivered by text messages, aimed at reducing the frequency of binge drinking in disadvantaged men. The process measures will identify components of the intervention which contribute to effectiveness. The study will also determine whether any benefit of the intervention is justified by the costs of intervening.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN07695192. Date assigned: 14 August 2013.

Original languageEnglish
Article number494
JournalTrials
Volume15
Early online date19 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Binge Drinking
Cell Phones
Vulnerable Populations
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Text Messaging
Alcohols
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Community-Institutional Relations
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Behavior
Feasibility Studies
Alcohol Drinking
Drinking
Health Services
Primary Health Care
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Delivery of Health Care
Control Groups

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A mobile phone intervention to reduce binge drinking among disadvantaged men : study protocol for a randomised controlled cost-effectiveness trial. / Crombie, Iain K; Irvine, Linda; Williams, Brian; Sniehotta, Falko F; Petrie, Dennis; Evans, Josie MM; Emslie, Carol; Jones, Claire; Ricketts, Ian W; Humphris, Gerry; Norrie, John; Rice, Peter; Slane, Peter W.

In: Trials, Vol. 15, 494, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crombie, IK, Irvine, L, Williams, B, Sniehotta, FF, Petrie, D, Evans, JMM, Emslie, C, Jones, C, Ricketts, IW, Humphris, G, Norrie, J, Rice, P & Slane, PW 2014, 'A mobile phone intervention to reduce binge drinking among disadvantaged men: study protocol for a randomised controlled cost-effectiveness trial', Trials, vol. 15, 494. https://doi.org/10.1186/1745-6215-15-494
Crombie, Iain K ; Irvine, Linda ; Williams, Brian ; Sniehotta, Falko F ; Petrie, Dennis ; Evans, Josie MM ; Emslie, Carol ; Jones, Claire ; Ricketts, Ian W ; Humphris, Gerry ; Norrie, John ; Rice, Peter ; Slane, Peter W. / A mobile phone intervention to reduce binge drinking among disadvantaged men : study protocol for a randomised controlled cost-effectiveness trial. In: Trials. 2014 ; Vol. 15.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Socially disadvantaged men are at a substantially higher risk of developing alcohol-related problems. The frequency of heavy drinking in a single session is high among disadvantaged men. Brief alcohol interventions were developed for, and are usually delivered in, healthcare settings. The group who binge drink most frequently, young to middle-aged disadvantaged men, have less contact with health services and there is a need for an alternative method of intervention delivery. Text messaging has been used successfully to modify other adverse health behaviours. This study will test whether text messages can reduce the frequency of binge drinking by disadvantaged men.METHODS/DESIGN: Disadvantaged men aged 25 to 44 years who drank >8 units of alcohol at least twice in the preceding month will be recruited from the community. Two recruitment strategies will be used: contacting men listed in primary care registers, and a community outreach method (time-space sampling). The intended sample of 798 men will be randomised to intervention or control, stratifying by recruitment method. The intervention group will receive a series of text messages designed to reduce the frequency of binge drinking through the formation of specific action plans. The control group will receive behaviourally neutral text messages intended to promote retention in the study. The primary outcome measure is the proportion of men consuming >8 units on at least three occasions in the previous 30 days. Secondary outcomes include total alcohol consumption and the frequency of consuming more than 16 units of alcohol in one session in the previous month. Process measures, developed during a previous feasibility study, will monitor engagement with the key behaviour change components of the intervention. The study will incorporate an economic evaluation comparing the costs of recruitment and intervention delivery with the benefits of reduced alcohol-related harm.DISCUSSION: This study will assess the effectiveness of a brief intervention, delivered by text messages, aimed at reducing the frequency of binge drinking in disadvantaged men. The process measures will identify components of the intervention which contribute to effectiveness. The study will also determine whether any benefit of the intervention is justified by the costs of intervening.TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN07695192. Date assigned: 14 August 2013.",
author = "Crombie, {Iain K} and Linda Irvine and Brian Williams and Sniehotta, {Falko F} and Dennis Petrie and Evans, {Josie MM} and Carol Emslie and Claire Jones and Ricketts, {Ian W} and Gerry Humphris and John Norrie and Peter Rice and Slane, {Peter W}",
note = "This project was funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research (NIHR PHR) programme (11/3050/30). The funding body played no role in the writing of this protocol or the decision to submit it for publication. The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NIHR PHR programme or the Department of Health.",
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T1 - A mobile phone intervention to reduce binge drinking among disadvantaged men

T2 - study protocol for a randomised controlled cost-effectiveness trial

AU - Crombie, Iain K

AU - Irvine, Linda

AU - Williams, Brian

AU - Sniehotta, Falko F

AU - Petrie, Dennis

AU - Evans, Josie MM

AU - Emslie, Carol

AU - Jones, Claire

AU - Ricketts, Ian W

AU - Humphris, Gerry

AU - Norrie, John

AU - Rice, Peter

AU - Slane, Peter W

N1 - This project was funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research (NIHR PHR) programme (11/3050/30). The funding body played no role in the writing of this protocol or the decision to submit it for publication. The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NIHR PHR programme or the Department of Health.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - BACKGROUND: Socially disadvantaged men are at a substantially higher risk of developing alcohol-related problems. The frequency of heavy drinking in a single session is high among disadvantaged men. Brief alcohol interventions were developed for, and are usually delivered in, healthcare settings. The group who binge drink most frequently, young to middle-aged disadvantaged men, have less contact with health services and there is a need for an alternative method of intervention delivery. Text messaging has been used successfully to modify other adverse health behaviours. This study will test whether text messages can reduce the frequency of binge drinking by disadvantaged men.METHODS/DESIGN: Disadvantaged men aged 25 to 44 years who drank >8 units of alcohol at least twice in the preceding month will be recruited from the community. Two recruitment strategies will be used: contacting men listed in primary care registers, and a community outreach method (time-space sampling). The intended sample of 798 men will be randomised to intervention or control, stratifying by recruitment method. The intervention group will receive a series of text messages designed to reduce the frequency of binge drinking through the formation of specific action plans. The control group will receive behaviourally neutral text messages intended to promote retention in the study. The primary outcome measure is the proportion of men consuming >8 units on at least three occasions in the previous 30 days. Secondary outcomes include total alcohol consumption and the frequency of consuming more than 16 units of alcohol in one session in the previous month. Process measures, developed during a previous feasibility study, will monitor engagement with the key behaviour change components of the intervention. The study will incorporate an economic evaluation comparing the costs of recruitment and intervention delivery with the benefits of reduced alcohol-related harm.DISCUSSION: This study will assess the effectiveness of a brief intervention, delivered by text messages, aimed at reducing the frequency of binge drinking in disadvantaged men. The process measures will identify components of the intervention which contribute to effectiveness. The study will also determine whether any benefit of the intervention is justified by the costs of intervening.TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN07695192. Date assigned: 14 August 2013.

AB - BACKGROUND: Socially disadvantaged men are at a substantially higher risk of developing alcohol-related problems. The frequency of heavy drinking in a single session is high among disadvantaged men. Brief alcohol interventions were developed for, and are usually delivered in, healthcare settings. The group who binge drink most frequently, young to middle-aged disadvantaged men, have less contact with health services and there is a need for an alternative method of intervention delivery. Text messaging has been used successfully to modify other adverse health behaviours. This study will test whether text messages can reduce the frequency of binge drinking by disadvantaged men.METHODS/DESIGN: Disadvantaged men aged 25 to 44 years who drank >8 units of alcohol at least twice in the preceding month will be recruited from the community. Two recruitment strategies will be used: contacting men listed in primary care registers, and a community outreach method (time-space sampling). The intended sample of 798 men will be randomised to intervention or control, stratifying by recruitment method. The intervention group will receive a series of text messages designed to reduce the frequency of binge drinking through the formation of specific action plans. The control group will receive behaviourally neutral text messages intended to promote retention in the study. The primary outcome measure is the proportion of men consuming >8 units on at least three occasions in the previous 30 days. Secondary outcomes include total alcohol consumption and the frequency of consuming more than 16 units of alcohol in one session in the previous month. Process measures, developed during a previous feasibility study, will monitor engagement with the key behaviour change components of the intervention. The study will incorporate an economic evaluation comparing the costs of recruitment and intervention delivery with the benefits of reduced alcohol-related harm.DISCUSSION: This study will assess the effectiveness of a brief intervention, delivered by text messages, aimed at reducing the frequency of binge drinking in disadvantaged men. The process measures will identify components of the intervention which contribute to effectiveness. The study will also determine whether any benefit of the intervention is justified by the costs of intervening.TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN07695192. Date assigned: 14 August 2013.

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DO - 10.1186/1745-6215-15-494

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JO - Trials

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