A neuroendocrine role for chemerin in hypothalamic remodelling and photoperiodic control of energy balance

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Abstract

Long-term and reversible changes in body weight are typical of seasonal animals. Thyroid hormone (TH) and retinoic acid (RA) within the tanycytes and ependymal cells of the hypothalamus have been implicated in the photoperiodic response. We investigated signalling downstream of RA and how this links to the control of body weight and food intake in photoperiodic F344 rats. Chemerin, an inflammatory chemokine, with a known role in energy metabolism, was identified as a target of RA. Gene expression of chemerin (Rarres2) and its receptors were localised within the tanycytes and ependymal cells, with higher expression under long (LD) versus short (SD) photoperiod, pointing to a physiological role. The SD to LD transition (increased food intake) was mimicked by 2 weeks of ICV infusion of chemerin into rats. Chemerin also increased expression of the cytoskeletal protein vimentin, implicating hypothalamic remodelling in this response. By contrast, acute ICV bolus injection of chemerin on a 12 h:12 h photoperiod inhibited food intake and decreased body weight with associated changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in growth and feeding after 24 hr. We describe the hypothalamic ventricular zone as a key site of neuroendocrine regulation, where the inflammatory signal, chemerin, links TH and RA signaling to hypothalamic remodeling.
Original languageEnglish
Article number26830
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 May 2016

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Tretinoin
Ependymoglial Cells
Eating
Photoperiod
Thyroid Hormones
Body Weight
Body Weight Changes
Cytoskeletal Proteins
Inbred F344 Rats
Vimentin
Neuropeptides
Chemokines
Energy Metabolism
Hypothalamus
Gene Expression
Injections
Growth

Keywords

  • chemerin
  • hypothalamus
  • tanycytes
  • body weight
  • food intake
  • energy balance
  • photoperiod
  • seasonal
  • plasticity
  • inflammation

Cite this

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title = "A neuroendocrine role for chemerin in hypothalamic remodelling and photoperiodic control of energy balance",
abstract = "Long-term and reversible changes in body weight are typical of seasonal animals. Thyroid hormone (TH) and retinoic acid (RA) within the tanycytes and ependymal cells of the hypothalamus have been implicated in the photoperiodic response. We investigated signalling downstream of RA and how this links to the control of body weight and food intake in photoperiodic F344 rats. Chemerin, an inflammatory chemokine, with a known role in energy metabolism, was identified as a target of RA. Gene expression of chemerin (Rarres2) and its receptors were localised within the tanycytes and ependymal cells, with higher expression under long (LD) versus short (SD) photoperiod, pointing to a physiological role. The SD to LD transition (increased food intake) was mimicked by 2 weeks of ICV infusion of chemerin into rats. Chemerin also increased expression of the cytoskeletal protein vimentin, implicating hypothalamic remodelling in this response. By contrast, acute ICV bolus injection of chemerin on a 12 h:12 h photoperiod inhibited food intake and decreased body weight with associated changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in growth and feeding after 24 hr. We describe the hypothalamic ventricular zone as a key site of neuroendocrine regulation, where the inflammatory signal, chemerin, links TH and RA signaling to hypothalamic remodeling.",
keywords = "chemerin, hypothalamus, tanycytes, body weight, food intake , energy balance, photoperiod, seasonal , plasticity, inflammation",
author = "Gisela Helfer and Ross, {Alexander W} and Thomson, {Lynn M} and Mayer, {Claus D} and Stoney, {Patrick N} and McCaffery, {Peter J} and Morgan, {Peter J}",
note = "We thank Donna Wallace and the animal house staff for their help with the animal studies. We thank Pat Bain for help in preparing the figures. This work was supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Science Research Council (BBSRC) grant number BB/K001043/1 (G.H., A.W.R., P.N.S., P.J.Mc. and P.J.M.) and the Scottish Government (A.W.R., L.M.T., C.D.M. and P.J.M.).",
year = "2016",
month = "5",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1038/srep26830",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - A neuroendocrine role for chemerin in hypothalamic remodelling and photoperiodic control of energy balance

AU - Helfer, Gisela

AU - Ross, Alexander W

AU - Thomson, Lynn M

AU - Mayer, Claus D

AU - Stoney, Patrick N

AU - McCaffery, Peter J

AU - Morgan, Peter J

N1 - We thank Donna Wallace and the animal house staff for their help with the animal studies. We thank Pat Bain for help in preparing the figures. This work was supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Science Research Council (BBSRC) grant number BB/K001043/1 (G.H., A.W.R., P.N.S., P.J.Mc. and P.J.M.) and the Scottish Government (A.W.R., L.M.T., C.D.M. and P.J.M.).

PY - 2016/5/26

Y1 - 2016/5/26

N2 - Long-term and reversible changes in body weight are typical of seasonal animals. Thyroid hormone (TH) and retinoic acid (RA) within the tanycytes and ependymal cells of the hypothalamus have been implicated in the photoperiodic response. We investigated signalling downstream of RA and how this links to the control of body weight and food intake in photoperiodic F344 rats. Chemerin, an inflammatory chemokine, with a known role in energy metabolism, was identified as a target of RA. Gene expression of chemerin (Rarres2) and its receptors were localised within the tanycytes and ependymal cells, with higher expression under long (LD) versus short (SD) photoperiod, pointing to a physiological role. The SD to LD transition (increased food intake) was mimicked by 2 weeks of ICV infusion of chemerin into rats. Chemerin also increased expression of the cytoskeletal protein vimentin, implicating hypothalamic remodelling in this response. By contrast, acute ICV bolus injection of chemerin on a 12 h:12 h photoperiod inhibited food intake and decreased body weight with associated changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in growth and feeding after 24 hr. We describe the hypothalamic ventricular zone as a key site of neuroendocrine regulation, where the inflammatory signal, chemerin, links TH and RA signaling to hypothalamic remodeling.

AB - Long-term and reversible changes in body weight are typical of seasonal animals. Thyroid hormone (TH) and retinoic acid (RA) within the tanycytes and ependymal cells of the hypothalamus have been implicated in the photoperiodic response. We investigated signalling downstream of RA and how this links to the control of body weight and food intake in photoperiodic F344 rats. Chemerin, an inflammatory chemokine, with a known role in energy metabolism, was identified as a target of RA. Gene expression of chemerin (Rarres2) and its receptors were localised within the tanycytes and ependymal cells, with higher expression under long (LD) versus short (SD) photoperiod, pointing to a physiological role. The SD to LD transition (increased food intake) was mimicked by 2 weeks of ICV infusion of chemerin into rats. Chemerin also increased expression of the cytoskeletal protein vimentin, implicating hypothalamic remodelling in this response. By contrast, acute ICV bolus injection of chemerin on a 12 h:12 h photoperiod inhibited food intake and decreased body weight with associated changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in growth and feeding after 24 hr. We describe the hypothalamic ventricular zone as a key site of neuroendocrine regulation, where the inflammatory signal, chemerin, links TH and RA signaling to hypothalamic remodeling.

KW - chemerin

KW - hypothalamus

KW - tanycytes

KW - body weight

KW - food intake

KW - energy balance

KW - photoperiod

KW - seasonal

KW - plasticity

KW - inflammation

U2 - 10.1038/srep26830

DO - 10.1038/srep26830

M3 - Article

VL - 6

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

M1 - 26830

ER -