A primary care Web-based Intervention Modeling Experiment replicated behavior changes seen in earlier paper-based experiment

Shaun Treweek, Jill J Francis, Debbie Bonetti, Karen Barnett, Martin P. Eccles, Jemma Hudson, Claire Jones, Nigel B Pitts, Ian W Ricketts, Frank Sullivan, Mark Weal, Graeme MacLennan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives: Intervention Modelling Experiment (IMEs) are a way of developing and testing behaviour change interventions prior to a trial. We aimed to test this methodology in a web-based IME that replicated the trial component of an earlier, paper-based IME.

Study design and setting: Three-arm, web-based randomised evaluation of two interventions (persuasive communication and action plan) and a ‘no intervention’ comparator. The interventions were designed to reduce the number of antibiotic prescriptions in the management of uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infection. General practitioners (GPs) were invited to complete an online questionnaire and eight clinical scenarios where an antibiotic might be considered.

Results: 129 GPs completed the questionnaire. GPs receiving the persuasive communication did not prescribe an antibiotic in 0.70 more scenarios (95% confidence interval = 0.17 to 1.24) than those in the control arm. For the action plan, GPs did not prescribe an antibiotic in 0.63 (95% CI = 0.11 to 1.15) more scenarios than those in the control arm. Unlike the earlier IME, behavioural intention was unaffected by the interventions; this may be due to a smaller sample size than intended.

Conclusions: A web-based IME largely replicated the findings of an earlier paper-based study, providing some grounds for confidence in the IME methodology.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-122
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume80
Early online date26 Jul 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

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General Practitioners
Primary Health Care
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Persuasive Communication
Respiratory Tract Infections
Sample Size
Prescriptions
Confidence Intervals
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • intervention modelling experiments
  • behaviour change
  • randomised controlled trials
  • prescribing
  • primary care

Cite this

A primary care Web-based Intervention Modeling Experiment replicated behavior changes seen in earlier paper-based experiment. / Treweek, Shaun; Francis, Jill J; Bonetti, Debbie; Barnett, Karen; Eccles, Martin P.; Hudson, Jemma; Jones, Claire; Pitts, Nigel B; Ricketts, Ian W; Sullivan, Frank; Weal, Mark; MacLennan, Graeme.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 80, 12.2016, p. 116-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Treweek, S, Francis, JJ, Bonetti, D, Barnett, K, Eccles, MP, Hudson, J, Jones, C, Pitts, NB, Ricketts, IW, Sullivan, F, Weal, M & MacLennan, G 2016, 'A primary care Web-based Intervention Modeling Experiment replicated behavior changes seen in earlier paper-based experiment', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, vol. 80, pp. 116-122. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinepi.2016.07.008
Treweek, Shaun ; Francis, Jill J ; Bonetti, Debbie ; Barnett, Karen ; Eccles, Martin P. ; Hudson, Jemma ; Jones, Claire ; Pitts, Nigel B ; Ricketts, Ian W ; Sullivan, Frank ; Weal, Mark ; MacLennan, Graeme. / A primary care Web-based Intervention Modeling Experiment replicated behavior changes seen in earlier paper-based experiment. In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 2016 ; Vol. 80. pp. 116-122.
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abstract = "Objectives: Intervention Modelling Experiment (IMEs) are a way of developing and testing behaviour change interventions prior to a trial. We aimed to test this methodology in a web-based IME that replicated the trial component of an earlier, paper-based IME. Study design and setting: Three-arm, web-based randomised evaluation of two interventions (persuasive communication and action plan) and a ‘no intervention’ comparator. The interventions were designed to reduce the number of antibiotic prescriptions in the management of uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infection. General practitioners (GPs) were invited to complete an online questionnaire and eight clinical scenarios where an antibiotic might be considered. Results: 129 GPs completed the questionnaire. GPs receiving the persuasive communication did not prescribe an antibiotic in 0.70 more scenarios (95{\%} confidence interval = 0.17 to 1.24) than those in the control arm. For the action plan, GPs did not prescribe an antibiotic in 0.63 (95{\%} CI = 0.11 to 1.15) more scenarios than those in the control arm. Unlike the earlier IME, behavioural intention was unaffected by the interventions; this may be due to a smaller sample size than intended. Conclusions: A web-based IME largely replicated the findings of an earlier paper-based study, providing some grounds for confidence in the IME methodology.",
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AU - Sullivan, Frank

AU - Weal, Mark

AU - MacLennan, Graeme

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N2 - Objectives: Intervention Modelling Experiment (IMEs) are a way of developing and testing behaviour change interventions prior to a trial. We aimed to test this methodology in a web-based IME that replicated the trial component of an earlier, paper-based IME. Study design and setting: Three-arm, web-based randomised evaluation of two interventions (persuasive communication and action plan) and a ‘no intervention’ comparator. The interventions were designed to reduce the number of antibiotic prescriptions in the management of uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infection. General practitioners (GPs) were invited to complete an online questionnaire and eight clinical scenarios where an antibiotic might be considered. Results: 129 GPs completed the questionnaire. GPs receiving the persuasive communication did not prescribe an antibiotic in 0.70 more scenarios (95% confidence interval = 0.17 to 1.24) than those in the control arm. For the action plan, GPs did not prescribe an antibiotic in 0.63 (95% CI = 0.11 to 1.15) more scenarios than those in the control arm. Unlike the earlier IME, behavioural intention was unaffected by the interventions; this may be due to a smaller sample size than intended. Conclusions: A web-based IME largely replicated the findings of an earlier paper-based study, providing some grounds for confidence in the IME methodology.

AB - Objectives: Intervention Modelling Experiment (IMEs) are a way of developing and testing behaviour change interventions prior to a trial. We aimed to test this methodology in a web-based IME that replicated the trial component of an earlier, paper-based IME. Study design and setting: Three-arm, web-based randomised evaluation of two interventions (persuasive communication and action plan) and a ‘no intervention’ comparator. The interventions were designed to reduce the number of antibiotic prescriptions in the management of uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infection. General practitioners (GPs) were invited to complete an online questionnaire and eight clinical scenarios where an antibiotic might be considered. Results: 129 GPs completed the questionnaire. GPs receiving the persuasive communication did not prescribe an antibiotic in 0.70 more scenarios (95% confidence interval = 0.17 to 1.24) than those in the control arm. For the action plan, GPs did not prescribe an antibiotic in 0.63 (95% CI = 0.11 to 1.15) more scenarios than those in the control arm. Unlike the earlier IME, behavioural intention was unaffected by the interventions; this may be due to a smaller sample size than intended. Conclusions: A web-based IME largely replicated the findings of an earlier paper-based study, providing some grounds for confidence in the IME methodology.

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