A reductionist approach to model photosynthetic self-regulation in eukaryotes in response to light

Anna Matuszyńska, Oliver Ebenhöh

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4 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Along with the development of several large-scale methods such as mass spectrometry or micro arrays, genome wide models became not only a possibility but an obvious tool for theoretical biologists to integrate and analyse complex biological data. Nevertheless, incorporating the dynamics of photosynthesis remains one of the major challenges while reconstructing metabolic networks of plants and other photosynthetic organisms. In this review, we aim to provide arguments that small-scale models are still a suitable choice when it comes to discovering organisational principles governing the design of biological systems. We give a brief overview of recent modelling efforts in understanding the interplay between rapid, photoprotective mechanisms and the redox balance within the thylakoid membrane, discussing the applicability of a reductionist approach in modelling self-regulation in plants and outline possible directions for further research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1133-1139
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemical Society Transactions
Volume43
Issue number6
Early online date27 Nov 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015

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Eukaryota
Light
Thylakoids
Photosynthesis
Biological systems
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Oxidation-Reduction
Mass spectrometry
Mass Spectrometry
Genes
Genome
Membranes
Research
Direction compound

Cite this

A reductionist approach to model photosynthetic self-regulation in eukaryotes in response to light. / Matuszyńska, Anna; Ebenhöh, Oliver.

In: Biochemical Society Transactions, Vol. 43, No. 6, 12.2015, p. 1133-1139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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