A reply to Etzkowitz' comments to Leydesdorff and Martin (2010): Technology transfer and the end of the Bayh-Dole effect

Loet Leydesdorff, Martin Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three periods can be distinguished in university patenting at the U.S. Patent and Trade Office (USPTO) since the Bayh–Dole Act of 1980: (1) a first period of exponential increase in university patenting till 1995 (filing date) or 1999 (issuing date); (2) a period of relative decline since 1999; and (3) in most recent years—since 2008—a linear increase in university patenting. We argue that this last period is driven by specific non-US universities (e.g., Tokyo University and Chinese University) patenting increasingly in the USA as the most competitive market for high-tech patents.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)927–934
Number of pages8
JournalScientometrics
Volume97
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

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A reply to Etzkowitz' comments to Leydesdorff and Martin (2010): Technology transfer and the end of the Bayh-Dole effect. / Leydesdorff, Loet; Meyer, Martin.

In: Scientometrics, Vol. 97, No. 3, 12.2013, p. 927–934.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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