A Role in Search of a Hero: A Constructivist approach to the evolution of Egyptian foreign policy, 1952-67

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Abstract

This article considers the potential contributions Constructivism could bring to both International Relations (IR) and Middle East Studies (MES) thanks to a framework which emphasises the transformative potential of political identity, as well as the importance of its location within specific historical, social, political and cultural pathways. Constructivism presents perhaps the best and most realistic opportunity to build bridges between traditionally isolationist fields like IR and MES, and the analytical and empirical sections of this paper intend to offer a brief example of how that cross-fertilisation might take place. However, as a post-positivist framework, Constructivism also offers the possibility of reflecting on the development and interaction (or lack thereof) of IR and MES themselves. Unfortunately, Constructivism still has to make any significant impact upon MES, and despite the potentially radical impact this deployment of it might have on IR, on this aspect Constructivist literature is puzzlingly silent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-105
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Mediterranean Studies
Volume14
Issue number1-2
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • International Relations (IR)
  • International Relations Theory
  • Egypt
  • Constructivism
  • Arab Nationalism

Cite this

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title = "A Role in Search of a Hero: A Constructivist approach to the evolution of Egyptian foreign policy, 1952-67",
abstract = "This article considers the potential contributions Constructivism could bring to both International Relations (IR) and Middle East Studies (MES) thanks to a framework which emphasises the transformative potential of political identity, as well as the importance of its location within specific historical, social, political and cultural pathways. Constructivism presents perhaps the best and most realistic opportunity to build bridges between traditionally isolationist fields like IR and MES, and the analytical and empirical sections of this paper intend to offer a brief example of how that cross-fertilisation might take place. However, as a post-positivist framework, Constructivism also offers the possibility of reflecting on the development and interaction (or lack thereof) of IR and MES themselves. Unfortunately, Constructivism still has to make any significant impact upon MES, and despite the potentially radical impact this deployment of it might have on IR, on this aspect Constructivist literature is puzzlingly silent.",
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AB - This article considers the potential contributions Constructivism could bring to both International Relations (IR) and Middle East Studies (MES) thanks to a framework which emphasises the transformative potential of political identity, as well as the importance of its location within specific historical, social, political and cultural pathways. Constructivism presents perhaps the best and most realistic opportunity to build bridges between traditionally isolationist fields like IR and MES, and the analytical and empirical sections of this paper intend to offer a brief example of how that cross-fertilisation might take place. However, as a post-positivist framework, Constructivism also offers the possibility of reflecting on the development and interaction (or lack thereof) of IR and MES themselves. Unfortunately, Constructivism still has to make any significant impact upon MES, and despite the potentially radical impact this deployment of it might have on IR, on this aspect Constructivist literature is puzzlingly silent.

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KW - International Relations Theory

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KW - Arab Nationalism

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