A simple rule of thumb for elegant prehension

Mark Arwyn Mon-Williams, J. R. Tresilian

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    32 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Reaching out to grasp an object (prehension) is a deceptively elegant and skilled behavior. The movement prior to object contact can be described as having two components [1], the movement of the hand to an appropriate location for gripping the object, the "transport" component, and the opening and closing of the aperture between the fingers as they prepare to grip the target, the "grasp" component. The grasp component is sensitive to the size of the object, so that a larger grasp aperture is formed for wider objects [1]; the maximum grasp aperture (MGA) is a little wider than the width of the target object and occurs later in the movement for larger objects [1, 2]. We present a simple model that can account for the temporal relationship between the transport and grasp components, We report the results of an experiment providing empirical support for our "rule of thumb." The model provides a simple, but plausible, account of a neural control strategy that has been the center of debate over the last two decades.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1058-1061
    Number of pages3
    JournalCurrent Biology
    Volume11
    Issue number13
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2001

    Keywords

    • VISUAL INFORMATION
    • NATURAL PREHENSION
    • MOVEMENTS
    • GRASP
    • TRANSPORT
    • COORDINATION
    • COMPONENTS
    • ACCURACY
    • REACH
    • SIZE

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