A solution to Darwin’s dilemma of 1859

Exceptional preservation in Salter’s material from the late Ediacaran Longmyndian Supergroup, England

Richard H T Callow, Martin D Brasier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Study of historical and fresh collections from the Longmyndian Supergroup sheds new light on Ediacaran microbial communities and taphonomy. First reported by Salter in 1856, and noted by Darwin in the Origin of Species in 1859, a range of macroscopic bedding plane markings are already well known from the Longmyndian supergroup. Here we report filamentous and sphaeromorph microfossils, variously preserved as carbonaceous films, by aluminosilicate permineralization and as bedding plane impressions. This supports a long-suspected link between wrinkle markings and microbes, and draws further attention to our hypothesis for a taphonomic bias towards high-quality soft tissue preservation in the Ediacaran Period.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the Geological Society
Volume166
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

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Ediacaran
bedding plane
soft tissue preservation
taphonomy
aluminosilicate
microfossil
microbial community
material

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A solution to Darwin’s dilemma of 1859 : Exceptional preservation in Salter’s material from the late Ediacaran Longmyndian Supergroup, England. / Callow, Richard H T; Brasier, Martin D.

In: Journal of the Geological Society , Vol. 166, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 1-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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