A Tipping Point in Dialect Obsolescence? Change across the Generations in Lerwick, Shetland

Jennifer Smith, Mercedes Durham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dialect spoken in the Shetland Islands is one of the most distinctive in the British Isles. However, there are claims that this variety is rapidly disappearing, with local forms replaced by more standard variants in the younger generations. In this paper we test these claims through a quantitative analysis of variable forms across three generations of speakers from the main town of Lerwick. We target six variables: two lexical, two morphosyntactic and two phonetic/phonological. Our results show that there is decline in use of the local forms across all six variables. Closer analysis of individual use reveals that the older age cohort form a linguistically homogeneous group. In contrast, the younger speakers form a heterogeneous group: half of the younger speakers have high rates of the local forms, while the other half uses the standard variants near-categorically. We suggest that these results may pinpoint the locus of rapid obsolescence in this traditionally relic dialect area.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-225
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Sociolinguistics
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

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dialect
phonetics
Group
town
Shetland
Obsolescence

Keywords

  • Lerwick
  • Shetland dialect
  • obsolescence change

Cite this

A Tipping Point in Dialect Obsolescence? Change across the Generations in Lerwick, Shetland. / Smith, Jennifer; Durham, Mercedes.

In: Journal of Sociolinguistics, Vol. 15, No. 2, 04.2011, p. 197-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, Jennifer ; Durham, Mercedes. / A Tipping Point in Dialect Obsolescence? Change across the Generations in Lerwick, Shetland. In: Journal of Sociolinguistics. 2011 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 197-225.
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