A triarchic theory of Jensenism: Persistent, conservative reductionism

I J Deary, J R Crawford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This response to Jensen's target article principally addresses his contribution to information processing accounts of human intelligence differences. Three characteristics of Jensen's research are commended: his persistence in researching a topic and the thoroughness of his scholarship; his willingness to build a research theme upon existing knowledge and to desist from invoking too many new constructs; and his reductionistic orientation. Of three live questions in intelligence research to which he is contributing-reaction times, correlated vectors and mental speed-we address the method of correlated vectors. Using, data from three representative samples tested on the Wechsler Adult intelligence Scale-Revised and on inspection time, we show that inspection time's correlations with WAIS-R subtests fail to support the usual trend found with the method of correlated vectors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-282
Number of pages10
JournalIntelligence
Volume26
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Keywords

  • INSPECTION TIME
  • HUMAN INTELLIGENCE
  • ABILITIES
  • SPEED

Cite this

A triarchic theory of Jensenism: Persistent, conservative reductionism. / Deary, I J ; Crawford, J R .

In: Intelligence, Vol. 26, 1998, p. 273-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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