Accumulation of promutagenic DNA adducts in the mouse distal colon after consumption of heme does not induce colonic neoplasms in the western diet model of spontaneous colorectal cancer

Jean Winter, Graeme P Young, Ying Hu, Silvia W Gratz, Michael A Conlon, Richard K Le Leu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Red meat is considered a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Heme is considered to promote colonic hyperproliferation and cell damage. Resistant starch (RS) is a food that ferments in the colon with studies demonstrating protective effects against CRC. By utilizing the western diet model of spontaneous CRC, we determined if feeding heme (as hemin chloride) equivalent to a high red meat diet would increase colonic DNA adducts and CRC and whether RS could abrogate such effects.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)550-558
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular Nutrition & Food Research
Volume58
Issue number3
Early online date1 Oct 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

Keywords

  • heme
  • 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine
  • O6-Methyl-2-deoxyguanosine
  • red meat
  • resistant starch

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