Adapting crops and cropping systems to future climates to ensure food security: the role of crop modelling

Robin B. Matthews, Mike Rivington, Shibu Muhammed, Adrian C. Newton, Paul D. Hallett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Food production systems in the next decades need to adapt, not only to increase production to meet the demand of a higher population and changes in diets using less land, water and nutrients, but also to reduce their carbon footprint and to warmer temperatures and altered precipitation patterns resulting from climate change. Crop simulation models offer a research tool for evaluating trade-offs of these potential adaptations and can form the basis of decision-support systems for farmers, and tools for education and training. We suggest that there are four areas in adapting crops and cropping systems that crop modelling can contribute: determining where and how well crops of the future will grow; contributing to crop improvement programmes; identifying what future crop management practices will be appropriate and assessing risk to crop production in the face of greater climate variability.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-28
Number of pages5
JournalGlobal Food Security
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2013

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Food Supply
food security
Climate
Crops
cropping systems
cropping practice
Carbon Footprint
climate
food
Food
crop
Climate Change
Practice Management
crops
modeling
Diet
Education
simulation model
carbon footprint
Temperature

Keywords

  • food production
  • adaptation
  • mitigation
  • crop simulation
  • lad use
  • trade-offs

Cite this

Adapting crops and cropping systems to future climates to ensure food security : the role of crop modelling. / Matthews, Robin B.; Rivington, Mike; Muhammed, Shibu; Newton, Adrian C. ; Hallett, Paul D. .

In: Global Food Security, Vol. 2, No. 1, 01.03.2013, p. 24-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matthews, Robin B. ; Rivington, Mike ; Muhammed, Shibu ; Newton, Adrian C. ; Hallett, Paul D. . / Adapting crops and cropping systems to future climates to ensure food security : the role of crop modelling. In: Global Food Security. 2013 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 24-28.
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