Adaptive negotiation in managing wireless sensor networks

Thao P. Le, Timothy J. Norman, Wamberto Vasconcelos

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The allocation of resources to tasks in an efficient manner is a key problem in computer science. One important application domain for solutions to this class of problem is the allocation of sensor resources for environmental monitoring, surveillance, or similar sensing tasks. In real-world problem domains, the problem is compounded by the fact that the number of tasks and resources change over time, the number of available resources is limited and tasks compete for resources. Thus, it is necessary for a practical allocation mechanism to have the flexibility to cope with dynamic environments, and to ensure that unfair advantages are not given to a subset of the tasks (say, because they arrived first). Typical contemporary approaches use agents to manage individual resources, and the allocation problem is modelled as a coordination problem. In existing approaches, however, the successful allocation of resources to a new task is strongly dependent upon the allocation of resources to existing tasks. In this paper we propose a novel negotiation mechanism for exchanging resources to accommodate the arrival of new tasks, dynamically re-arranging the resource allocation. We have shown, via a set of experiments, that our approach offers significantly better results when compared with an agent-based approach without resource re-allocation through concurrent negotiation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPrinciples and Practice of Multi-Agent Systems - 13th International Conference, PRIMA 2010, Revised Selected Papers
Pages121-136
Number of pages16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2012
Event13th International Conference on Principles and Practice of Multi-Agent Systems, PRIMA 2010 - Kolkata, India
Duration: 12 Nov 201015 Nov 2010

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume7057 LNAI
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference13th International Conference on Principles and Practice of Multi-Agent Systems, PRIMA 2010
CountryIndia
CityKolkata
Period12/11/1015/11/10

Fingerprint

Wireless Sensor Networks
Wireless sensor networks
Resources
Computer science
Resource allocation
Monitoring
Sensors
Experiments
Unfair
Environmental Monitoring
Dynamic Environment
Resource Allocation
Surveillance
Concurrent
Computer Science
Sensing
Flexibility
Sensor
Subset
Necessary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Le, T. P., Norman, T. J., & Vasconcelos, W. (2012). Adaptive negotiation in managing wireless sensor networks. In Principles and Practice of Multi-Agent Systems - 13th International Conference, PRIMA 2010, Revised Selected Papers (pp. 121-136). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 7057 LNAI). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-25920-3_9

Adaptive negotiation in managing wireless sensor networks. / Le, Thao P.; Norman, Timothy J.; Vasconcelos, Wamberto.

Principles and Practice of Multi-Agent Systems - 13th International Conference, PRIMA 2010, Revised Selected Papers. 2012. p. 121-136 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 7057 LNAI).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Le, TP, Norman, TJ & Vasconcelos, W 2012, Adaptive negotiation in managing wireless sensor networks. in Principles and Practice of Multi-Agent Systems - 13th International Conference, PRIMA 2010, Revised Selected Papers. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 7057 LNAI, pp. 121-136, 13th International Conference on Principles and Practice of Multi-Agent Systems, PRIMA 2010, Kolkata, India, 12/11/10. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-25920-3_9
Le TP, Norman TJ, Vasconcelos W. Adaptive negotiation in managing wireless sensor networks. In Principles and Practice of Multi-Agent Systems - 13th International Conference, PRIMA 2010, Revised Selected Papers. 2012. p. 121-136. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-25920-3_9
Le, Thao P. ; Norman, Timothy J. ; Vasconcelos, Wamberto. / Adaptive negotiation in managing wireless sensor networks. Principles and Practice of Multi-Agent Systems - 13th International Conference, PRIMA 2010, Revised Selected Papers. 2012. pp. 121-136 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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