Adiposity and plane of nutrition influence reproductive neuroendocrine and appetite responses to intracerebroventricular insulin and neuropeptide-Y in sheep

D.W. Miller, E.J. Bennett, J.L. Harrison, Patricia Findlay, Clare Lesley Adam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-term nutritional background is thought to influence hypothalamic appetite and reproductive neuroendocrine responses to short-term nutritional feedback. In order to investigate this phenomenon, the effects of intracerebroventricular
administration of insulin or neuropeptide-Y (NPY) on LH secretion and voluntary food intake (VFI) were examined in sheep that were initially thin and kept on an increasing nutritional plane (INP), or initially fat and kept on a decreasing nutritional plane (DNP), for 10 weeks. Intracerebroventricular insulin stimulated LH secretion and suppressed VFI in INP sheep when initially thin, but not when they became fat, and had no effect on LH in DNP sheep when initially
fat, and stimulated LH secretion when they became thin. Intracerebroventricular NPY had no effect on LH or VFI in INPsheep when initially thin, decreased LH secretion and increased VFI when they became fat, and decreased LH secretion
in DNP sheep when initially fat but had no effect when they became thin. Therefore, sensitivity to insulin increases with low or decreasing nutritional status and decreases with high or increasing nutritional status, whereas sensitivity to NPY increases with high or increasing nutritional status and decreases with low or decreasing nutritional status. In conclusion, reproductive neuroendocrine and appetite responses to acute changes in nutritional feedback signals depend on the individual’s longer-term nutritional background.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-338
Number of pages10
JournalReproduction, Fertility and Development
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

Fingerprint

neuropeptide Y
Neuropeptide Y
Adiposity
adiposity
Appetite
feeding level
appetite
Nutritional Status
nutritional status
food intake
Sheep
insulin
Eating
Fats
secretion
Insulin
sheep
lipids
Insulin Resistance

Keywords

  • body fat
  • food intake
  • GnRH
  • hypothalamus
  • LH

Cite this

Adiposity and plane of nutrition influence reproductive neuroendocrine and appetite responses to intracerebroventricular insulin and neuropeptide-Y in sheep. / Miller, D.W.; Bennett, E.J.; Harrison, J.L.; Findlay, Patricia; Adam, Clare Lesley.

In: Reproduction, Fertility and Development, Vol. 23, No. 2, 01.2011, p. 329-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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