Advancing Cumulative Evidence on Behaviour Change Techniques and Interventions: A comment on Peters, de Bruin, and Crutzen (2013)

Susan Michie, Blair T Johnson, Marie Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Synthesising trial evidence to assist in the design and implementation of behaviour change interventions presents enormous challenges. Methods that have been used in the past, involving meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials of specific intervention ‘packages’ in poorly specified contexts, coupled with subjective judgements about generalisability, are now being superseded by more systematic approaches involving application of theory and precise systems for characterising the content and context of interventions. In an effort to move this area forward, Peters, de Bruin, and Crutzen (2013) point to limitations with research synthesis approaches that analyse single behaviour change techniques (BCTs) and present an alternative methodology. While their article provides food for thought, it will be important when considering the merits of their alternative approach to evaluate what has already been achieved using the full potential of currently available methods to examine combinations of BCTs. The current comment also clarifies BCT definitions and methodology.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-29
Number of pages5
JournalHealth Psychology Review
Volume9
Issue number1
Early online date2 May 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Meta-Analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research

Keywords

  • Behaviour change techniques
  • Behaviour change intervention
  • evidence

Cite this

Advancing Cumulative Evidence on Behaviour Change Techniques and Interventions : A comment on Peters, de Bruin, and Crutzen (2013). / Michie, Susan; Johnson, Blair T; Johnston, Marie.

In: Health Psychology Review, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2015, p. 25-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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