Alarms: Heuristics for the Control of Reasoning Attention

Timothy J Norman, Derek Long

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Abstract

Agents in the real world must be capable of autonomous goal creation. One effect of this ability is that the agent may generate a substantial number of goals, but only a small number of these will be relevant at any one time. Therefore, there is a need for some heuristic mechanism to control an agent’s reasoning attention. Such a mechanism is presented in this paper: alarms. Alarms serve to focus the attention of the agent on the most salient goals, and thereby avoid unnecessary reasoning. In this way, a resource-bounded agent can employ modern planning methods to effectiveness.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
Pages494-499
Publication statusPublished - 1995

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Norman, T. J., & Long, D. (1995). Alarms: Heuristics for the Control of Reasoning Attention. In Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 494-499)

Alarms: Heuristics for the Control of Reasoning Attention. / Norman, Timothy J; Long, Derek.

Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. 1995. p. 494-499.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Norman, TJ & Long, D 1995, Alarms: Heuristics for the Control of Reasoning Attention. in Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. pp. 494-499.
Norman TJ, Long D. Alarms: Heuristics for the Control of Reasoning Attention. In Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. 1995. p. 494-499
Norman, Timothy J ; Long, Derek. / Alarms: Heuristics for the Control of Reasoning Attention. Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. 1995. pp. 494-499
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