Aluminium toxicity in the rat brain: histochemical and immunocytochemical evidence

Bettina Platt, G. Fiddler, Z. Henderson, Gernot Riedel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

132 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the neurotoxic actions of aluminium (At) have been well documented, its contribution to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. In the present study, we applied histochemical techniques to identify changes induced by intracerebroventricular Al injections (5.4 mug in 5.5 mul, daily over a period of 5 successive days) in the adult rat brain after survival periods of either 1 or 6 weeks. For both Al- and saline-infused controls, no major signs of gross histological changes were evident in cresyl violet-stained sections. Al (as indicated by the fluorescent Morin staining) was concentrated in white matter of the media[ striatum, corpus callosum, and cingulate bundle. Immunoreactivity of astrocytes and phagocytic microglia based on glial fibrillary acidic protein and EDI markers, respectively, revealed a greater inflammatory response in Al-injected animals compared to controls. Damage of the cingulate bundle in Al-treated animals led to a severe anterograde degeneration of cholinergic terminals in cortex and hippocampus, as indicated by acetylcholinesterase labelling. Our data suggest that the enhancement of inflammation and the interference with cholinergic projections may be the modes of action through which Al may cause learning and memory deficits, and contribute to pathological processes in Alzheimer's disease. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-267
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • acetylcholine
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • degeneration
  • inflammation
  • glia
  • LONG-TERM POTENTIATION
  • ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
  • NEUROFIBRILLARY DEGENERATION
  • CHOLINERGIC DENERVATION
  • HIPPOCAMPAL-NEURONS
  • NUCLEUS BASALIS
  • IN-VITRO
  • ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE
  • RECEPTOR
  • INFLAMMATION

Cite this

Aluminium toxicity in the rat brain: histochemical and immunocytochemical evidence. / Platt, Bettina; Fiddler, G.; Henderson, Z.; Riedel, Gernot.

In: Brain Research Bulletin, Vol. 55, No. 2, 2001, p. 257-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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