Tertiary deep-marine reservoirs of the North Sea region

An introduction

T. McKie*, P. T S Rose, A. J. Hartley, D. W. Jones, T. L. Armstrong

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The early discovery of the Arbroath Field in 1969, and the Montrose and giant Forties fields in 1970, initiated intensive exploration of the Tertiary deep-marine play in the North Sea region. Numerous subsequent discoveries (Fig. 1), including Frigg (in 1971), Maureen (in 1973), Gannet (in 1973), Andrew (in 1974), Pierce (in 1976), Everest (in 1982), Alba (in 1984), Gryphon (in 1987), Nelson (in 1988), Harding (in 1988), Jotun (in 1994), Siri (in 1995) and Merganser (in 1995), demonstrate the success of this play and the geological diversity of Paleocene and Eocene systems present within the region. Although the North Sea Basin is now considered mature, with Cenozoic reservoirs well along their creaming curve (Vining et al. 2005), recent discoveries (e.g. the Catcher Field in 2010) highlight that potential still remains within intensively explored areas such as the Central North Sea, as well as in the less explored regions such as the Atlantic margin and the Norwegian Sea. The importance of these reservoirs is demonstrated by the large proportion of UK production to which they contribute, amounting to approximately 25% of all production from UK oil fields since 1975 on a barrel of oil equivalent (BOE) basis (Fig. 2). Indeed, over time that proportion has increased from 20% of production in the 1970s and 1980s to 30% from the 1990s.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTertiary Deep-Marine Reservoirs of the North Sea Region
EditorsT McKie, P T S Rose, A J Hartley, D W Jones, T L Armstrong
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherGeological Society of London
Pages1-16
Number of pages16
Volume403
Edition1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Publication series

NameSpecial Publications
PublisherThe Geological Society of London
ISSN (Print)0305-8719

Fingerprint

Oil fields
Paleocene
oil field
Eocene
sea
oil
basin
Oils

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ocean Engineering
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Geology

Cite this

McKie, T., Rose, P. T. S., Hartley, A. J., Jones, D. W., & Armstrong, T. L. (2015). Tertiary deep-marine reservoirs of the North Sea region: An introduction. In T. McKie, P. T. S. Rose, A. J. Hartley, D. W. Jones, & T. L. Armstrong (Eds.), Tertiary Deep-Marine Reservoirs of the North Sea Region (1 ed., Vol. 403, pp. 1-16). (Special Publications). London: Geological Society of London. https://doi.org/10.1144/SP403.12

Tertiary deep-marine reservoirs of the North Sea region : An introduction. / McKie, T.; Rose, P. T S; Hartley, A. J.; Jones, D. W.; Armstrong, T. L.

Tertiary Deep-Marine Reservoirs of the North Sea Region. ed. / T McKie; P T S Rose; A J Hartley; D W Jones; T L Armstrong. Vol. 403 1. ed. London : Geological Society of London, 2015. p. 1-16 (Special Publications).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

McKie, T, Rose, PTS, Hartley, AJ, Jones, DW & Armstrong, TL 2015, Tertiary deep-marine reservoirs of the North Sea region: An introduction. in T McKie, PTS Rose, AJ Hartley, DW Jones & TL Armstrong (eds), Tertiary Deep-Marine Reservoirs of the North Sea Region. 1 edn, vol. 403, Special Publications, Geological Society of London, London, pp. 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1144/SP403.12
McKie T, Rose PTS, Hartley AJ, Jones DW, Armstrong TL. Tertiary deep-marine reservoirs of the North Sea region: An introduction. In McKie T, Rose PTS, Hartley AJ, Jones DW, Armstrong TL, editors, Tertiary Deep-Marine Reservoirs of the North Sea Region. 1 ed. Vol. 403. London: Geological Society of London. 2015. p. 1-16. (Special Publications). https://doi.org/10.1144/SP403.12
McKie, T. ; Rose, P. T S ; Hartley, A. J. ; Jones, D. W. ; Armstrong, T. L. / Tertiary deep-marine reservoirs of the North Sea region : An introduction. Tertiary Deep-Marine Reservoirs of the North Sea Region. editor / T McKie ; P T S Rose ; A J Hartley ; D W Jones ; T L Armstrong. Vol. 403 1. ed. London : Geological Society of London, 2015. pp. 1-16 (Special Publications).
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