Antibiotic-treated infections in intensive care patients in the UK. Anaesthesia

Brian Cuthbertson, M. Thompson, A. Sherry, M. M. Wright, G. J. Bellingan, Intensive Care Soc

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The purpose of this audit was to study reasons for starting antibiotic therapy, duration of antibiotic treatment, reasons for changing antibiotics and the agreement between clinical suspicion and microbiological results in intensive care practice. We conducted a multicentre observational audit of 316 patients. Data on demographic details, site, treatment and nature of infection were collected. The median duration of antibiotic therapy was 7 days. Infections were community-acquired in 160 patients (55%). Antibiotics were started on clinical suspicion of infection in 237 patients (75%). Pulmonary infections were the most common, representing 52% of all proven infections. Gram-negative organisms were the most common cause of proven infections (n = 90 (50%)). The antibiotic spectrum was narrowed in light of microbiology results in 78 patients (43%) and changed due to antibiotic resistance in 38 patients (21%). We conclude that the mean duration of treatment contrasts with existing published guidelines, highlighting the need for further studies on duration and efficacy of treatment in intensive care.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)885-890
    Number of pages5
    JournalAnaesthesia
    Volume59
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

    Keywords

    • intensive care
    • infection
    • antibiotics
    • VENTILATOR-ASSOCIATED PNEUMONIA
    • ANTIMICROBIAL THERAPY
    • ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA
    • UNITS
    • PRESCRIPTION
    • GUIDELINES
    • PREVALENCE
    • FAILURE
    • IMPACT

    Cite this

    Cuthbertson, B., Thompson, M., Sherry, A., Wright, M. M., Bellingan, G. J., & Intensive Care Soc (2004). Antibiotic-treated infections in intensive care patients in the UK. Anaesthesia. Anaesthesia, 59(9), 885-890. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2044.2004.03742.x

    Antibiotic-treated infections in intensive care patients in the UK. Anaesthesia. / Cuthbertson, Brian; Thompson, M.; Sherry, A.; Wright, M. M.; Bellingan, G. J.; Intensive Care Soc.

    In: Anaesthesia, Vol. 59, No. 9, 2004, p. 885-890.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Cuthbertson, B, Thompson, M, Sherry, A, Wright, MM, Bellingan, GJ & Intensive Care Soc 2004, 'Antibiotic-treated infections in intensive care patients in the UK. Anaesthesia', Anaesthesia, vol. 59, no. 9, pp. 885-890. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2044.2004.03742.x
    Cuthbertson B, Thompson M, Sherry A, Wright MM, Bellingan GJ, Intensive Care Soc. Antibiotic-treated infections in intensive care patients in the UK. Anaesthesia. Anaesthesia. 2004;59(9):885-890. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2044.2004.03742.x
    Cuthbertson, Brian ; Thompson, M. ; Sherry, A. ; Wright, M. M. ; Bellingan, G. J. ; Intensive Care Soc. / Antibiotic-treated infections in intensive care patients in the UK. Anaesthesia. In: Anaesthesia. 2004 ; Vol. 59, No. 9. pp. 885-890.
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