Antimicrobial drug use and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Aberdeen, 1996-2000.

D. L. Monnet, Fiona MacKenzie, J. M. Lopez-Lozano, A. Beyaert, M. Camacho, R. Wilson, D. Stuart, Ian M Gould

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    159 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Similar to many hospitals worldwide, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary has had an outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In this setting, the outbreak is attributable to two major clones. The relationships between antimicrobial use and MRSA prevalence were analyzed by time-series analysis. From June 1997 to December 2000, dynamic, temporal relationships were found between monthly %MRSA and previous %MRSA, macrolide use, third-generation cephalosporin use, and fluoroquinolone use. This study suggests that use of antimicrobial drugs to which the MRSA outbreak strains are resistant may be an important factor in perpetuating the outbreak. Moreover, this study confirmed the ecologic effect of antimicrobial drug use (i.e., current antimicrobial use) may have an effect on resistance in future patients. Although these results may not be generalized to other hospitals, they suggest new directions for control of MRSA, which has thus far proved difficult and expensive.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1432-1441
    Number of pages9
    JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
    Volume10
    Issue number8
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

    Keywords

    • POLYMERASE-CHAIN-REACTION
    • NOSOCOMIAL TRANSMISSION
    • KLEBSIELLA-PNEUMONIAE
    • RISK-FACTORS
    • STRAINS
    • INFECTIONS
    • OUTBREAK
    • CIPROFLOXACIN
    • PROPHYLAXIS
    • EMRSA-15

    Cite this

    Monnet, D. L., MacKenzie, F., Lopez-Lozano, J. M., Beyaert, A., Camacho, M., Wilson, R., ... Gould, I. M. (2004). Antimicrobial drug use and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Aberdeen, 1996-2000. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 10(8), 1432-1441.

    Antimicrobial drug use and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Aberdeen, 1996-2000. / Monnet, D. L.; MacKenzie, Fiona; Lopez-Lozano, J. M.; Beyaert, A.; Camacho, M.; Wilson, R.; Stuart, D.; Gould, Ian M.

    In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 10, No. 8, 2004, p. 1432-1441.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Monnet, DL, MacKenzie, F, Lopez-Lozano, JM, Beyaert, A, Camacho, M, Wilson, R, Stuart, D & Gould, IM 2004, 'Antimicrobial drug use and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Aberdeen, 1996-2000.', Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 10, no. 8, pp. 1432-1441.
    Monnet DL, MacKenzie F, Lopez-Lozano JM, Beyaert A, Camacho M, Wilson R et al. Antimicrobial drug use and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Aberdeen, 1996-2000. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004;10(8):1432-1441.
    Monnet, D. L. ; MacKenzie, Fiona ; Lopez-Lozano, J. M. ; Beyaert, A. ; Camacho, M. ; Wilson, R. ; Stuart, D. ; Gould, Ian M. / Antimicrobial drug use and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Aberdeen, 1996-2000. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004 ; Vol. 10, No. 8. pp. 1432-1441.
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    AB - Similar to many hospitals worldwide, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary has had an outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In this setting, the outbreak is attributable to two major clones. The relationships between antimicrobial use and MRSA prevalence were analyzed by time-series analysis. From June 1997 to December 2000, dynamic, temporal relationships were found between monthly %MRSA and previous %MRSA, macrolide use, third-generation cephalosporin use, and fluoroquinolone use. This study suggests that use of antimicrobial drugs to which the MRSA outbreak strains are resistant may be an important factor in perpetuating the outbreak. Moreover, this study confirmed the ecologic effect of antimicrobial drug use (i.e., current antimicrobial use) may have an effect on resistance in future patients. Although these results may not be generalized to other hospitals, they suggest new directions for control of MRSA, which has thus far proved difficult and expensive.

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