Antioxidant and B vitamin intake in relation to cognitive function in later life in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936

G McNeill, X Jia, L J Whalley, H C Fox, J Corley, A J Gow, C E Brett, J M Starr, I J Deary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Objectives: Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies provide some evidence for an association between intake of antioxidants and B vitamins, and cognitive function in later life, but intervention studies have not provided clear evidence of beneficial effects. The possibility that those with higher cognitive ability during earlier adult life consume more nutrient-rich diets in later life could provide an alternative explanation for the associations seen in observational studies.

Methods: Survey of 1091 men and women born in 1936 living in Edinburgh, Scotland, in whom previous cognitive ability was available from intelligence quotient (IQ) measurements at age 11 years. At age 70 years, participants carried out a range of cognitive tests and completed a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ).

Results: A total of 882 participants returned completed FFQs from which intake of β-carotene, vitamin C, B12, folate and riboflavin was estimated. IQ at age 11 years was positively associated with dietary intake of vitamin C (P=0.048) and inversely associated with dietary intake of riboflavin (P<0.001) at age 70 years, and was higher in those taking folate supplements at age 70 years (P<0.005). Weak associations between intake of vitamins B12, C, riboflavin and folate and cognitive performance at age 70 years were attenuated by adjustment for confounding variables, including IQ at age 11 years. In the fully adjusted models, the proportion of total variance in cognitive function at age 70 years accounted for by intake of these nutrients was less than 1%.

Conclusion: These results provide no evidence for a clinically significant beneficial association between intake of these antioxidants and B vitamins, and cognitive function at age 70 years.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)619-626
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume65
Issue number5
Early online date23 Feb 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

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Vitamin B Complex
Riboflavin
Intelligence
Folic Acid
Cognition
Ascorbic Acid
Aptitude
Antioxidants
Parturition
Vitamin B 12
Food
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Scotland
Carotenoids
Observational Studies
Longitudinal Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • cognition
  • antioxidants
  • vitamin B complex
  • dietary supplements
  • aged

Cite this

Antioxidant and B vitamin intake in relation to cognitive function in later life in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936. / McNeill, G; Jia, X; Whalley, L J; Fox, H C; Corley, J; Gow, A J; Brett, C E; Starr, J M; Deary, I J.

In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 65, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 619-626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McNeill, G ; Jia, X ; Whalley, L J ; Fox, H C ; Corley, J ; Gow, A J ; Brett, C E ; Starr, J M ; Deary, I J. / Antioxidant and B vitamin intake in relation to cognitive function in later life in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936. In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2011 ; Vol. 65, No. 5. pp. 619-626.
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N2 - Background/Objectives: Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies provide some evidence for an association between intake of antioxidants and B vitamins, and cognitive function in later life, but intervention studies have not provided clear evidence of beneficial effects. The possibility that those with higher cognitive ability during earlier adult life consume more nutrient-rich diets in later life could provide an alternative explanation for the associations seen in observational studies.Methods: Survey of 1091 men and women born in 1936 living in Edinburgh, Scotland, in whom previous cognitive ability was available from intelligence quotient (IQ) measurements at age 11 years. At age 70 years, participants carried out a range of cognitive tests and completed a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ).Results: A total of 882 participants returned completed FFQs from which intake of β-carotene, vitamin C, B12, folate and riboflavin was estimated. IQ at age 11 years was positively associated with dietary intake of vitamin C (P=0.048) and inversely associated with dietary intake of riboflavin (P<0.001) at age 70 years, and was higher in those taking folate supplements at age 70 years (P<0.005). Weak associations between intake of vitamins B12, C, riboflavin and folate and cognitive performance at age 70 years were attenuated by adjustment for confounding variables, including IQ at age 11 years. In the fully adjusted models, the proportion of total variance in cognitive function at age 70 years accounted for by intake of these nutrients was less than 1%.Conclusion: These results provide no evidence for a clinically significant beneficial association between intake of these antioxidants and B vitamins, and cognitive function at age 70 years.

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