Appeals against detention in excessive security (outcomes of appeals against detention in conditions of excessive security in Scotland)

Alexander Slater, Daniel M Bennett, Gabriele Vojt, Lindsay Thomson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 introduced the right for patients in high-security psychiatric care to appeal against detention in conditions of excessive security. A previous study examined the first 100 patients to appeal under this provision. In this study we compare them with the next cohort of 110 patients to lodge an appeal, finding, contrary to expectations, no change in patient characteristics or the outcome of their appeals. The clinical, legal and demographic features of successful and unsuccessful appellants, who made up 38% and 27% of the 110 patients, respectively, were also compared. Those patients with the support of their responsible medical officer and those already included on a transfer list had a significantly better chance of success (p = 0.00). It was also found that a history of excessive alcohol consumption was associated with successful appeals (p = 0.002). A diagnosis of learning disability was associated with unsuccessful appeals (p = 0.018), though the sub-sample was very small. These findings are important given the forthcoming extension of this right of appeal to other levels of security.
© The Author(s) 2015.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-177
Number of pages6
JournalMedicine, science, and the law
Volume56
Issue number3
Early online date24 Jun 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2016

Keywords

  • forensic psychiatry
  • law
  • medical law
  • legal system
  • high security
  • excessive security

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