Application of the Dynamic Gastrointestinal Simulator (simgi®) to assess the impact of probiotic supplementation in the metabolism of grape polyphenols

Irene Gil-Sánchez, Carolina Cueva, Alba Tamargo, Jose C. Quintela, Esther de la Fuente, Alan W. Walker, M. Victoria Moreno-Arribas, Begoña Bartolomé* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this paper, the Dynamic Gastrointestinal Simulator (simgi®) is used as a model to the study the metabolic activity of probiotics at the intestinal level, and in particular, to assess the impact of probiotic supplementation in the microbial metabolism of grape polyphenols. Two independent simulations using fecal samples from two healthy volunteers were carried out. Changes in microbiota composition and in metabolic activity were assessed by qPCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and by analyses of phenolic metabolites and ammonium ions (NH4+). The strain Lactobacillus plantarum CLC 17 was successfully implanted in the colon compartments of the simgi® after daily feeding of 2x1010 CFU/day for 7 days. Overall, no changes in bacterial diversity were observed after probiotic implantation. In comparison to the digestion of the grape polyphenols on their own, the inclusion of L. plantarum CLC 17 in the simgi® colon compartments led to a greater formation of phenolic metabolites such as benzoic acids, probably by the breakdown of high-molecular-weight procyanidin polymers. These results provide evidence that the probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum CLC 17 may improve the metabolism of dietary polyphenols when used as a food ingredient.
Original languageEnglish
Article number108790
JournalFood Research International
Volume129
Early online date21 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 21 Nov 2019

Fingerprint

Vitis
Probiotics
Polyphenols
Lactobacillus plantarum
probiotics
grapes
polyphenols
metabolism
colon
Colon
benzoic acids
metabolites
ammonium compounds
metabolic studies
Microbiota
Benzoates
Ammonium Compounds
rRNA Genes
volunteers
Digestion

Keywords

  • simgi® model
  • CLC 17
  • phenolic metabolites
  • metabolism
  • gut microbiota

Cite this

Application of the Dynamic Gastrointestinal Simulator (simgi®) to assess the impact of probiotic supplementation in the metabolism of grape polyphenols. / Gil-Sánchez, Irene; Cueva, Carolina; Tamargo, Alba; Quintela, Jose C.; de la Fuente, Esther; Walker, Alan W.; Moreno-Arribas, M. Victoria; Bartolomé, Begoña (Corresponding Author).

In: Food Research International, Vol. 129, 108790, 03.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gil-Sánchez, Irene ; Cueva, Carolina ; Tamargo, Alba ; Quintela, Jose C. ; de la Fuente, Esther ; Walker, Alan W. ; Moreno-Arribas, M. Victoria ; Bartolomé, Begoña. / Application of the Dynamic Gastrointestinal Simulator (simgi®) to assess the impact of probiotic supplementation in the metabolism of grape polyphenols. In: Food Research International. 2020 ; Vol. 129.
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abstract = "In this paper, the Dynamic Gastrointestinal Simulator (simgi{\circledR}) is used as a model to the study the metabolic activity of probiotics at the intestinal level, and in particular, to assess the impact of probiotic supplementation in the microbial metabolism of grape polyphenols. Two independent simulations using fecal samples from two healthy volunteers were carried out. Changes in microbiota composition and in metabolic activity were assessed by qPCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and by analyses of phenolic metabolites and ammonium ions (NH4+). The strain Lactobacillus plantarum CLC 17 was successfully implanted in the colon compartments of the simgi{\circledR} after daily feeding of 2x1010 CFU/day for 7 days. Overall, no changes in bacterial diversity were observed after probiotic implantation. In comparison to the digestion of the grape polyphenols on their own, the inclusion of L. plantarum CLC 17 in the simgi{\circledR} colon compartments led to a greater formation of phenolic metabolites such as benzoic acids, probably by the breakdown of high-molecular-weight procyanidin polymers. These results provide evidence that the probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum CLC 17 may improve the metabolism of dietary polyphenols when used as a food ingredient.",
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author = "Irene Gil-S{\'a}nchez and Carolina Cueva and Alba Tamargo and Quintela, {Jose C.} and {de la Fuente}, Esther and Walker, {Alan W.} and Moreno-Arribas, {M. Victoria} and Bego{\~n}a Bartolom{\'e}",
note = "Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank Prof. Juan Miguel Rodriguez (University Complutense of Madrid, Spain) for his kindness in providing us with the probiotic strain L. plantarum CLC 17. They are also grateful to Gillian Donachie, Pascaline Brien and Patricia Garcia-M{\'a}rmol for their technical assistance and to the Centre for Genome-Enabled Biology and Medicine (CGEBM) at the University of Aberdeen for carrying out the 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Part of this work was funded by NATAC S A (Madrid, Spain). Additional funding came from the projects AGL2015-64522-C2-1-R of the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (MINECO) and ALIBIRD S2013/ABI-2728 and ALIBIRD2020-CM P2018/BAA-4343 of the Comunidad de Madrid. Alan Walker receives core funding support from the Scottish Government’s Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services (RESAS) division. The authors would also like to acknowledge the support of the Maxwell compute cluster funded by the University of Aberdeen (Scotland).",
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AU - Walker, Alan W.

AU - Moreno-Arribas, M. Victoria

AU - Bartolomé, Begoña

N1 - Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank Prof. Juan Miguel Rodriguez (University Complutense of Madrid, Spain) for his kindness in providing us with the probiotic strain L. plantarum CLC 17. They are also grateful to Gillian Donachie, Pascaline Brien and Patricia Garcia-Mármol for their technical assistance and to the Centre for Genome-Enabled Biology and Medicine (CGEBM) at the University of Aberdeen for carrying out the 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Part of this work was funded by NATAC S A (Madrid, Spain). Additional funding came from the projects AGL2015-64522-C2-1-R of the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (MINECO) and ALIBIRD S2013/ABI-2728 and ALIBIRD2020-CM P2018/BAA-4343 of the Comunidad de Madrid. Alan Walker receives core funding support from the Scottish Government’s Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services (RESAS) division. The authors would also like to acknowledge the support of the Maxwell compute cluster funded by the University of Aberdeen (Scotland).

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N2 - In this paper, the Dynamic Gastrointestinal Simulator (simgi®) is used as a model to the study the metabolic activity of probiotics at the intestinal level, and in particular, to assess the impact of probiotic supplementation in the microbial metabolism of grape polyphenols. Two independent simulations using fecal samples from two healthy volunteers were carried out. Changes in microbiota composition and in metabolic activity were assessed by qPCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and by analyses of phenolic metabolites and ammonium ions (NH4+). The strain Lactobacillus plantarum CLC 17 was successfully implanted in the colon compartments of the simgi® after daily feeding of 2x1010 CFU/day for 7 days. Overall, no changes in bacterial diversity were observed after probiotic implantation. In comparison to the digestion of the grape polyphenols on their own, the inclusion of L. plantarum CLC 17 in the simgi® colon compartments led to a greater formation of phenolic metabolites such as benzoic acids, probably by the breakdown of high-molecular-weight procyanidin polymers. These results provide evidence that the probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum CLC 17 may improve the metabolism of dietary polyphenols when used as a food ingredient.

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