Archaeoentomology at Tatsip Ataa

Evidence for the Use of Local Resources and Daily Life in the Norse Eastern Settlement, Greenland

Frédéric Dussault, Veronique Forbes, Allison Bain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Thirty-one sediment samples collected from midden layers at the Tatsip Ataa (E172) site located in the former Norse Eastern Settlement in Greenland were analyzed for insect remains. These efforts allowed for the identification of species believed to have been introduced involuntarily with Norse settlers upon colonization, while suggesting the origin of materials disposed of in the midden. Our analysis of outdoor insects and synanthropes also identified resources exploited from the local environment, suggesting that the midden represents the end result of a number of domestic activities including construction, maintenance, hygienic practices, and animal husbandry.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-28
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of the North Atlantic
VolumeSpecial Volume 6
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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animal husbandry
colonization
resources
evidence
Greenland
Archaeoentomology
Middens
Resources
Daily Life

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Archaeoentomology at Tatsip Ataa : Evidence for the Use of Local Resources and Daily Life in the Norse Eastern Settlement, Greenland. / Dussault, Frédéric ; Forbes, Veronique; Bain, Allison.

In: Journal of the North Atlantic, Vol. Special Volume 6, 2014, p. 14-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dussault, Frédéric ; Forbes, Veronique ; Bain, Allison. / Archaeoentomology at Tatsip Ataa : Evidence for the Use of Local Resources and Daily Life in the Norse Eastern Settlement, Greenland. In: Journal of the North Atlantic. 2014 ; Vol. Special Volume 6. pp. 14-28.
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