Are pharmacological randomised controlled clinical trials relevant to real-life asthma populations? A protocol for an UNLOCK study from the IPCRG

Karin Lisspers, Pedro Teixeira, Coert Blom, Janwillem Kocks, Björn Ställberg, David Price, Niels Chavannes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Asthma has a high prevalence worldwide with a high incidence in primary care settings in many countries. It is by definition a variable disease with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes, in which management and treatment can be difficult. The aim of asthma treatment is optimal control of the disease, which according to Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines implies both symptom control and prevention of exacerbations. Despite several treatment options, studies show that about half of the patients have poor asthma control. When asthma is not controlled, it decreases the quality of life, increases the risk of exacerbations and premature death and is a high cost for the society.
Original languageEnglish
Article number16016
Pages (from-to)1-3
Number of pages3
Journalnpj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine
Volume26
Early online date14 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Asthma
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pharmacology
Population
Premature Mortality
Primary Health Care
Therapeutics
Quality of Life
Guidelines
Phenotype
Costs and Cost Analysis
Incidence

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Are pharmacological randomised controlled clinical trials relevant to real-life asthma populations? A protocol for an UNLOCK study from the IPCRG. / Lisspers, Karin; Teixeira, Pedro; Blom, Coert; Kocks, Janwillem; Ställberg, Björn; Price, David; Chavannes, Niels.

In: npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine, Vol. 26, 16016, 2016, p. 1-3.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lisspers, Karin ; Teixeira, Pedro ; Blom, Coert ; Kocks, Janwillem ; Ställberg, Björn ; Price, David ; Chavannes, Niels. / Are pharmacological randomised controlled clinical trials relevant to real-life asthma populations? A protocol for an UNLOCK study from the IPCRG. In: npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 26. pp. 1-3.
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