Are smallholder farmers willing to pay for a flexible balloon biogas digester? Evidence from a case study in Uganda

Moris Kabyanga, Bedru B Balana (Corresponding Author), Johnny Mugisha, Peter N. Walekhwa, Jo Smith, Klaus Glenk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Biogas technology, as a pro-poor renewable energy source, has
been promoted in Uganda through the use of fixed dome and floating drum
digester designs. However, these designs have proved to be too expensive
for the average Ugandan to afford. A cheaper flexible balloon digester
has been proposed to increase uptake. However, there has been lack of
evidence on household's willingness to pay (WTP) for the flexible balloon
digester. Primary data were obtained from survey of experimental
households and 144 non-biogas households in central Uganda. A logistic
regression model was used to estimate household's WTP and determine the
factors that influence WTP. Results reveal that the majority of surveyed
households showed their WTP, but an average household's maximum WTP
(US$52) was ten times less than the actual cost of an imported digester
unit (US$512). The results further indicate that household size, cost of
fuelwood, and a household's perception on technology significantly
influenced the WTP. Thus, government and NGOs interested in promoting
this design should pay due attention on ensuring the availability of
affordable flexible balloon digester from local sources. Otherwise, focus
should be on promoting either different biogas designs or alternative
affordable renewable energy technologies rather than the flexible balloon
digester
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-129
Number of pages7
JournalEnergy for Sustainable Development
Volume43
Early online date3 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018

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Balloons
Biogas
willingness to pay
smallholder
Uganda
biogas
farmer
evidence
renewable energy
Domes
Costs
energy technology
household size
energy source
Availability
floating
costs
cost
nongovernmental organization
non-governmental organization

Keywords

  • biogas
  • willingness to pay
  • flexible balloon digester
  • Uganda

Cite this

Are smallholder farmers willing to pay for a flexible balloon biogas digester? Evidence from a case study in Uganda. / Kabyanga, Moris; Balana, Bedru B (Corresponding Author); Mugisha, Johnny; Walekhwa, Peter N.; Smith, Jo; Glenk, Klaus.

In: Energy for Sustainable Development, Vol. 43, 04.2018, p. 123-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kabyanga, Moris ; Balana, Bedru B ; Mugisha, Johnny ; Walekhwa, Peter N. ; Smith, Jo ; Glenk, Klaus. / Are smallholder farmers willing to pay for a flexible balloon biogas digester? Evidence from a case study in Uganda. In: Energy for Sustainable Development. 2018 ; Vol. 43. pp. 123-129.
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