Arsenic uptake and accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) irrigated with contaminated water

M J Abedin, J Cotter-Howells, A A Meharg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

205 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-term use of arsenic contaminated groundwater to irrigate crops, especially paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) has resulted in elevated soil arsenic levels in Bangladesh. There is, therefore, concern regarding accumulation of arsenic in rice grown on these soils. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of arsenic-contaminated irrigation water on the growth and uptake of arsenic into rice grain, husk, straw and root. There were altogether 10 treatments which were a combination of five arsenate irrigation water concentrations (0-8 mg As l(-)1) and two soil phosphate amendments. Use of arsenate containing irrigation water reduced plant height, decreased rice yield and affected development of root growth. Arsenic concentrations in all plant parts increased with increasing arsenate concentration in irrigation water. However, arsenic concentration in rice grain did not exceed the maximum permissible limit of 1.0 mg As kg(-)1. Arsenic accumulation in rice straw at very high levels indicates that feeding cattle with such contaminated straw could be a direct threat for their health and also, indirectly, to human health via presumably contaminated bovine meat and milk. Phosphate application neither showed any significant difference in plant growth and development, nor in As concentrations in plant parts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)311-319
Number of pages9
JournalCommunications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
Volume240
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • arsenic concentrations
  • irrigation water
  • rice
  • soil
  • HOLCUS-LANATUS
  • LEAD-ARSENATE
  • FLOODED CONDITIONS
  • CHEMICAL FORM
  • SOIL SOLUTION
  • PLANTS
  • TOXICITY
  • GROWTH
  • COPPER
  • PHYTOCHELATINS

Cite this

Arsenic uptake and accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) irrigated with contaminated water. / Abedin, M J ; Cotter-Howells, J ; Meharg, A A .

In: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, Vol. 240, 2002, p. 311-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Long-term use of arsenic contaminated groundwater to irrigate crops, especially paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) has resulted in elevated soil arsenic levels in Bangladesh. There is, therefore, concern regarding accumulation of arsenic in rice grown on these soils. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of arsenic-contaminated irrigation water on the growth and uptake of arsenic into rice grain, husk, straw and root. There were altogether 10 treatments which were a combination of five arsenate irrigation water concentrations (0-8 mg As l(-)1) and two soil phosphate amendments. Use of arsenate containing irrigation water reduced plant height, decreased rice yield and affected development of root growth. Arsenic concentrations in all plant parts increased with increasing arsenate concentration in irrigation water. However, arsenic concentration in rice grain did not exceed the maximum permissible limit of 1.0 mg As kg(-)1. Arsenic accumulation in rice straw at very high levels indicates that feeding cattle with such contaminated straw could be a direct threat for their health and also, indirectly, to human health via presumably contaminated bovine meat and milk. Phosphate application neither showed any significant difference in plant growth and development, nor in As concentrations in plant parts.",
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T1 - Arsenic uptake and accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) irrigated with contaminated water

AU - Abedin, M J

AU - Cotter-Howells, J

AU - Meharg, A A

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Long-term use of arsenic contaminated groundwater to irrigate crops, especially paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) has resulted in elevated soil arsenic levels in Bangladesh. There is, therefore, concern regarding accumulation of arsenic in rice grown on these soils. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of arsenic-contaminated irrigation water on the growth and uptake of arsenic into rice grain, husk, straw and root. There were altogether 10 treatments which were a combination of five arsenate irrigation water concentrations (0-8 mg As l(-)1) and two soil phosphate amendments. Use of arsenate containing irrigation water reduced plant height, decreased rice yield and affected development of root growth. Arsenic concentrations in all plant parts increased with increasing arsenate concentration in irrigation water. However, arsenic concentration in rice grain did not exceed the maximum permissible limit of 1.0 mg As kg(-)1. Arsenic accumulation in rice straw at very high levels indicates that feeding cattle with such contaminated straw could be a direct threat for their health and also, indirectly, to human health via presumably contaminated bovine meat and milk. Phosphate application neither showed any significant difference in plant growth and development, nor in As concentrations in plant parts.

AB - Long-term use of arsenic contaminated groundwater to irrigate crops, especially paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) has resulted in elevated soil arsenic levels in Bangladesh. There is, therefore, concern regarding accumulation of arsenic in rice grown on these soils. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of arsenic-contaminated irrigation water on the growth and uptake of arsenic into rice grain, husk, straw and root. There were altogether 10 treatments which were a combination of five arsenate irrigation water concentrations (0-8 mg As l(-)1) and two soil phosphate amendments. Use of arsenate containing irrigation water reduced plant height, decreased rice yield and affected development of root growth. Arsenic concentrations in all plant parts increased with increasing arsenate concentration in irrigation water. However, arsenic concentration in rice grain did not exceed the maximum permissible limit of 1.0 mg As kg(-)1. Arsenic accumulation in rice straw at very high levels indicates that feeding cattle with such contaminated straw could be a direct threat for their health and also, indirectly, to human health via presumably contaminated bovine meat and milk. Phosphate application neither showed any significant difference in plant growth and development, nor in As concentrations in plant parts.

KW - arsenic concentrations

KW - irrigation water

KW - rice

KW - soil

KW - HOLCUS-LANATUS

KW - LEAD-ARSENATE

KW - FLOODED CONDITIONS

KW - CHEMICAL FORM

KW - SOIL SOLUTION

KW - PLANTS

KW - TOXICITY

KW - GROWTH

KW - COPPER

KW - PHYTOCHELATINS

M3 - Article

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SP - 311

EP - 319

JO - Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis

JF - Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis

SN - 0010-3624

ER -