Arsenosugar Metabolism Not Unique to the Sheep of North Ronaldsay

Simon James Martin, Christopher Richard Newcombe, Andrea Raab, Jorg Feldmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Here we describe a feeding trial with Blackface sheep conducted on an organic farm in Kintyre (Scotland), which aims to prove that the metabolism of arsenic, acquired from the consumption of seaweed, is not unique to the North Ronaldsay sheep, which are adapted to a seaweed diet. Results show that the trial sheep supplemented their diet with, on average, 20 +/- 9% Laminaria digitata when given the choice. The daily arsenic intake varied greatly from sheep to sheep but on average, the sheep consumed 65 mu g kg(-1) b.w. Total arsenic concentrations in urine, as measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) (m/z 75) also show significant differences between the trial and control group (P < 0.0001). HPLC coupled with ICP-MS in parallel with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ES-MS) for detection was used for the identification of arsenic metabolites in urine samples. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) is the main metabolite in the control group as well as in the trial group. In addition, arsenic metabolites previously only found in the urine of North Ronaldsay sheep were successfully identified in the urine of the trial group of the seaweed-eating Blackface sheep: dimethylarsinoyl acetic acid (DMAA) and its thio-analogue dimethylarsinothioyl acetic acid (DMAAS) as well as the monosulfide of DMAV, DMAS. However, the poor chromatographic recovery indicates that the urine contains arsenic species, which do not elute under the conditions tested.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)190-197
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Chemistry
Volume2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2005

Keywords

  • arsenic
  • contaminant metabolism
  • speciation (nonmetals)
  • KELP ECKLONIA-RADIATA
  • SEAWEED-EATING SHEEP
  • ARSENIC SPECIATION
  • HUMAN URINE
  • DRINKING-WATER
  • LIVER-DISEASE
  • ICP-MS
  • ARSENOBETAINE
  • INGESTION
  • TOXICITY

Cite this

Arsenosugar Metabolism Not Unique to the Sheep of North Ronaldsay. / Martin, Simon James; Newcombe, Christopher Richard; Raab, Andrea; Feldmann, Jorg.

In: Environmental Chemistry, Vol. 2, 08.2005, p. 190-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, Simon James ; Newcombe, Christopher Richard ; Raab, Andrea ; Feldmann, Jorg. / Arsenosugar Metabolism Not Unique to the Sheep of North Ronaldsay. In: Environmental Chemistry. 2005 ; Vol. 2. pp. 190-197.
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