Arterial dysfunction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and the consumption of daily fruits and daily vegetables

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Abstract

Background/Objectives:
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with increased arterial dysfunction and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Regular fruit and vegetable consumption prevents cardiovascular disease, but their influence on arterial dysfunction in RA has not been investigated. We assessed the relationship between daily fruit-vegetable consumption and arterial dysfunction in this high-risk group.
Subjects/Methods:
Participants were recruited from a consecutive series of RA patients aged 40-65 years without overt cardiovascular disease attending rheumatology clinics. Standardised research nurse assessment included SphygmoCor pulse wave analysis using radial applanation tonometry (a higher augmentation index (AIX%) indicates arterial dysfunction), fasting blood sample, patient questionnaire and medical record review. Multivariable analysis was used to adjust for age, sex, cholesterol, mean arterial blood pressure, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, physical activity, cumulative inflammatory burden, rheumatoid nodules, disability and education.
Results:
We recruited 114 RA patients: 81% female, mean age 54 years, median arthritis duration 10 years and mean AIX% 31.5 (s.d. 7.7). Fruit and vegetable consumption were significantly correlated (Spearman's rho 0.54, P«0.0001) and on unadjusted analysis daily fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with a lower AIX% (-3.2; 95% CI -6.4 to -0.1, P=0.05). On adjusted analysis AIX% was lower with daily vegetable (-4.2; 95% CI -7.9 to -0.5; P=0.003), but not with daily fruit (-0.02; 95% CI -3.9 to 3.8; P=0.99) consumption.
Conclusions:
Daily vegetable consumption, but not daily fruit consumption, was independently associated with more favourable arterial function in patients with RA. These findings are consistent with the enterosalivary circulation of nitrate having an influence on arterial function.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-352
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume66
Early online date30 Nov 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint

Vegetables
Fruit
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Cardiovascular Diseases
Arterial Pressure
Rheumatoid Nodule
Pulse Wave Analysis
Manometry
Rheumatology
Alcohol Drinking
Nitrates
Habits
Arthritis
Medical Records
Fasting
Smoking
Nurses
Cholesterol
Exercise
Education

Keywords

  • arterial dysfunction
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • diet
  • vegetables
  • fruit

Cite this

@article{ce2c6b6fb87a4cecb26b1bbba8819735,
title = "Arterial dysfunction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and the consumption of daily fruits and daily vegetables",
abstract = "Background/Objectives:Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with increased arterial dysfunction and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Regular fruit and vegetable consumption prevents cardiovascular disease, but their influence on arterial dysfunction in RA has not been investigated. We assessed the relationship between daily fruit-vegetable consumption and arterial dysfunction in this high-risk group.Subjects/Methods:Participants were recruited from a consecutive series of RA patients aged 40-65 years without overt cardiovascular disease attending rheumatology clinics. Standardised research nurse assessment included SphygmoCor pulse wave analysis using radial applanation tonometry (a higher augmentation index (AIX{\%}) indicates arterial dysfunction), fasting blood sample, patient questionnaire and medical record review. Multivariable analysis was used to adjust for age, sex, cholesterol, mean arterial blood pressure, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, physical activity, cumulative inflammatory burden, rheumatoid nodules, disability and education.Results:We recruited 114 RA patients: 81{\%} female, mean age 54 years, median arthritis duration 10 years and mean AIX{\%} 31.5 (s.d. 7.7). Fruit and vegetable consumption were significantly correlated (Spearman's rho 0.54, P«0.0001) and on unadjusted analysis daily fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with a lower AIX{\%} (-3.2; 95{\%} CI -6.4 to -0.1, P=0.05). On adjusted analysis AIX{\%} was lower with daily vegetable (-4.2; 95{\%} CI -7.9 to -0.5; P=0.003), but not with daily fruit (-0.02; 95{\%} CI -3.9 to 3.8; P=0.99) consumption.Conclusions: Daily vegetable consumption, but not daily fruit consumption, was independently associated with more favourable arterial function in patients with RA. These findings are consistent with the enterosalivary circulation of nitrate having an influence on arterial function.",
keywords = "arterial dysfunction, rheumatoid arthritis, diet, vegetables, fruit",
author = "Crilly, {Michael A} and Geraldine McNeill",
year = "2012",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1038/ejcn.2011.199",
language = "English",
volume = "66",
pages = "345--352",
journal = "European Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
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T1 - Arterial dysfunction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and the consumption of daily fruits and daily vegetables

AU - Crilly, Michael A

AU - McNeill, Geraldine

PY - 2012/3

Y1 - 2012/3

N2 - Background/Objectives:Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with increased arterial dysfunction and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Regular fruit and vegetable consumption prevents cardiovascular disease, but their influence on arterial dysfunction in RA has not been investigated. We assessed the relationship between daily fruit-vegetable consumption and arterial dysfunction in this high-risk group.Subjects/Methods:Participants were recruited from a consecutive series of RA patients aged 40-65 years without overt cardiovascular disease attending rheumatology clinics. Standardised research nurse assessment included SphygmoCor pulse wave analysis using radial applanation tonometry (a higher augmentation index (AIX%) indicates arterial dysfunction), fasting blood sample, patient questionnaire and medical record review. Multivariable analysis was used to adjust for age, sex, cholesterol, mean arterial blood pressure, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, physical activity, cumulative inflammatory burden, rheumatoid nodules, disability and education.Results:We recruited 114 RA patients: 81% female, mean age 54 years, median arthritis duration 10 years and mean AIX% 31.5 (s.d. 7.7). Fruit and vegetable consumption were significantly correlated (Spearman's rho 0.54, P«0.0001) and on unadjusted analysis daily fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with a lower AIX% (-3.2; 95% CI -6.4 to -0.1, P=0.05). On adjusted analysis AIX% was lower with daily vegetable (-4.2; 95% CI -7.9 to -0.5; P=0.003), but not with daily fruit (-0.02; 95% CI -3.9 to 3.8; P=0.99) consumption.Conclusions: Daily vegetable consumption, but not daily fruit consumption, was independently associated with more favourable arterial function in patients with RA. These findings are consistent with the enterosalivary circulation of nitrate having an influence on arterial function.

AB - Background/Objectives:Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with increased arterial dysfunction and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Regular fruit and vegetable consumption prevents cardiovascular disease, but their influence on arterial dysfunction in RA has not been investigated. We assessed the relationship between daily fruit-vegetable consumption and arterial dysfunction in this high-risk group.Subjects/Methods:Participants were recruited from a consecutive series of RA patients aged 40-65 years without overt cardiovascular disease attending rheumatology clinics. Standardised research nurse assessment included SphygmoCor pulse wave analysis using radial applanation tonometry (a higher augmentation index (AIX%) indicates arterial dysfunction), fasting blood sample, patient questionnaire and medical record review. Multivariable analysis was used to adjust for age, sex, cholesterol, mean arterial blood pressure, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, physical activity, cumulative inflammatory burden, rheumatoid nodules, disability and education.Results:We recruited 114 RA patients: 81% female, mean age 54 years, median arthritis duration 10 years and mean AIX% 31.5 (s.d. 7.7). Fruit and vegetable consumption were significantly correlated (Spearman's rho 0.54, P«0.0001) and on unadjusted analysis daily fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with a lower AIX% (-3.2; 95% CI -6.4 to -0.1, P=0.05). On adjusted analysis AIX% was lower with daily vegetable (-4.2; 95% CI -7.9 to -0.5; P=0.003), but not with daily fruit (-0.02; 95% CI -3.9 to 3.8; P=0.99) consumption.Conclusions: Daily vegetable consumption, but not daily fruit consumption, was independently associated with more favourable arterial function in patients with RA. These findings are consistent with the enterosalivary circulation of nitrate having an influence on arterial function.

KW - arterial dysfunction

KW - rheumatoid arthritis

KW - diet

KW - vegetables

KW - fruit

U2 - 10.1038/ejcn.2011.199

DO - 10.1038/ejcn.2011.199

M3 - Article

VL - 66

SP - 345

EP - 352

JO - European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0954-3007

ER -