Assessing the Association Between Electrical Stimulation Dose, Subsequent Cognitive Function and Depression Severity in Patients Receiving Bilateral Electroconvulsive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder

Jenny Sinclair, Gordon Fernie, Daniel Mark Bennett, Ian Cameron Reid, Isobel Mary Cameron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between electrical stimulation administered to patients undergoing bilateral electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and subsequent measures of cognitive function and depression severity.

METHODS: Stimulus dose titrated patients receiving bilateral ECT were assessed with the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) Spatial Recognition Memory test and Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at baseline, after 4 ECT treatments and on course completion. Changes in CANTAB and MADRS scores were assessed in relation to electrical dosage, initial stimulus dose, and demographic variables using linear mixed models.

RESULTS: Data pertained to 143 patients (mean age, 56.85 [SD, 14.94], 43% male). Median change in CANTAB score was -10% (-20% to 5%) after 4 ECT treatments and -10% (-20% to 5%) at course completion. Median change in MADRS score was -22 (-33 to -13) after 4 ECT treatments and -14 (-25 to -7) at course completion. Electrical dosage had no effect on CANTAB or MADRS change scores either after 4 treatments or course completion. Improvement in CANTAB score at end of course was associated with female sex (P < 0.05), higher intelligence quotient (P = 0.01), and age. After 4 treatments, improvement in CANTAB score was associated with younger age (P < 0.001) and higher intelligence quotient (P < 0.01). Improved MADRS score at course completion was associated with older age (P < 0.001 at end of course and after 4 treatments).

CONCLUSIONS: Electroconvulsive therapy has significant antidepressant and cognitive effects which are not associated with the total electrical dose administered. Other, unalterable variables, such as age and sex, have an influence on these effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-163
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of ECT
Volume32
Issue number3
Early online date28 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2016

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Electroconvulsive Therapy
Neuropsychological Tests
Major Depressive Disorder
Cognition
Electric Stimulation
Depression
Intelligence
Therapeutics
Antidepressive Agents
Linear Models
Demography

Keywords

  • major depressive disorder
  • ECT
  • electrical stimulation dose
  • cognitive function
  • depressive severity

Cite this

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title = "Assessing the Association Between Electrical Stimulation Dose, Subsequent Cognitive Function and Depression Severity in Patients Receiving Bilateral Electroconvulsive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between electrical stimulation administered to patients undergoing bilateral electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and subsequent measures of cognitive function and depression severity.METHODS: Stimulus dose titrated patients receiving bilateral ECT were assessed with the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) Spatial Recognition Memory test and Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at baseline, after 4 ECT treatments and on course completion. Changes in CANTAB and MADRS scores were assessed in relation to electrical dosage, initial stimulus dose, and demographic variables using linear mixed models.RESULTS: Data pertained to 143 patients (mean age, 56.85 [SD, 14.94], 43{\%} male). Median change in CANTAB score was -10{\%} (-20{\%} to 5{\%}) after 4 ECT treatments and -10{\%} (-20{\%} to 5{\%}) at course completion. Median change in MADRS score was -22 (-33 to -13) after 4 ECT treatments and -14 (-25 to -7) at course completion. Electrical dosage had no effect on CANTAB or MADRS change scores either after 4 treatments or course completion. Improvement in CANTAB score at end of course was associated with female sex (P < 0.05), higher intelligence quotient (P = 0.01), and age. After 4 treatments, improvement in CANTAB score was associated with younger age (P < 0.001) and higher intelligence quotient (P < 0.01). Improved MADRS score at course completion was associated with older age (P < 0.001 at end of course and after 4 treatments).CONCLUSIONS: Electroconvulsive therapy has significant antidepressant and cognitive effects which are not associated with the total electrical dose administered. Other, unalterable variables, such as age and sex, have an influence on these effects.",
keywords = "major depressive disorder, ECT , electrical stimulation dose, cognitive function, depressive severity",
author = "Jenny Sinclair and Gordon Fernie and Bennett, {Daniel Mark} and Reid, {Ian Cameron} and Cameron, {Isobel Mary}",
year = "2016",
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doi = "10.1097/YCT.0000000000000321",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "159--163",
journal = "Journal of ECT",
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T1 - Assessing the Association Between Electrical Stimulation Dose, Subsequent Cognitive Function and Depression Severity in Patients Receiving Bilateral Electroconvulsive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder

AU - Sinclair, Jenny

AU - Fernie, Gordon

AU - Bennett, Daniel Mark

AU - Reid, Ian Cameron

AU - Cameron, Isobel Mary

PY - 2016/9

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between electrical stimulation administered to patients undergoing bilateral electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and subsequent measures of cognitive function and depression severity.METHODS: Stimulus dose titrated patients receiving bilateral ECT were assessed with the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) Spatial Recognition Memory test and Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at baseline, after 4 ECT treatments and on course completion. Changes in CANTAB and MADRS scores were assessed in relation to electrical dosage, initial stimulus dose, and demographic variables using linear mixed models.RESULTS: Data pertained to 143 patients (mean age, 56.85 [SD, 14.94], 43% male). Median change in CANTAB score was -10% (-20% to 5%) after 4 ECT treatments and -10% (-20% to 5%) at course completion. Median change in MADRS score was -22 (-33 to -13) after 4 ECT treatments and -14 (-25 to -7) at course completion. Electrical dosage had no effect on CANTAB or MADRS change scores either after 4 treatments or course completion. Improvement in CANTAB score at end of course was associated with female sex (P < 0.05), higher intelligence quotient (P = 0.01), and age. After 4 treatments, improvement in CANTAB score was associated with younger age (P < 0.001) and higher intelligence quotient (P < 0.01). Improved MADRS score at course completion was associated with older age (P < 0.001 at end of course and after 4 treatments).CONCLUSIONS: Electroconvulsive therapy has significant antidepressant and cognitive effects which are not associated with the total electrical dose administered. Other, unalterable variables, such as age and sex, have an influence on these effects.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between electrical stimulation administered to patients undergoing bilateral electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and subsequent measures of cognitive function and depression severity.METHODS: Stimulus dose titrated patients receiving bilateral ECT were assessed with the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) Spatial Recognition Memory test and Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at baseline, after 4 ECT treatments and on course completion. Changes in CANTAB and MADRS scores were assessed in relation to electrical dosage, initial stimulus dose, and demographic variables using linear mixed models.RESULTS: Data pertained to 143 patients (mean age, 56.85 [SD, 14.94], 43% male). Median change in CANTAB score was -10% (-20% to 5%) after 4 ECT treatments and -10% (-20% to 5%) at course completion. Median change in MADRS score was -22 (-33 to -13) after 4 ECT treatments and -14 (-25 to -7) at course completion. Electrical dosage had no effect on CANTAB or MADRS change scores either after 4 treatments or course completion. Improvement in CANTAB score at end of course was associated with female sex (P < 0.05), higher intelligence quotient (P = 0.01), and age. After 4 treatments, improvement in CANTAB score was associated with younger age (P < 0.001) and higher intelligence quotient (P < 0.01). Improved MADRS score at course completion was associated with older age (P < 0.001 at end of course and after 4 treatments).CONCLUSIONS: Electroconvulsive therapy has significant antidepressant and cognitive effects which are not associated with the total electrical dose administered. Other, unalterable variables, such as age and sex, have an influence on these effects.

KW - major depressive disorder

KW - ECT

KW - electrical stimulation dose

KW - cognitive function

KW - depressive severity

U2 - 10.1097/YCT.0000000000000321

DO - 10.1097/YCT.0000000000000321

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 159

EP - 163

JO - Journal of ECT

JF - Journal of ECT

SN - 1095-0680

IS - 3

ER -