Assessment of the influence of intrinsic environmental and geographical factors on the bacterial ecology of pit latrines

Belen Torondel, Jeroen H. J. Ensink, Ozan Gundogdu, Umer Zeeshan Ijaz, Julian Parkhill, Faraji Abdelahi, Viet-Anh Nguyen, Steven Sudgen, Walter Gibson, Alan W. Walker, Christopher Quince

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Abstract

Improving the rate and extent of faecal decomposition in basic forms of sanitation such as pit latrines would benefit around 1.7 billion users worldwide, but to do so requires a major advance in our understanding of the biology of these systems. As a critical first step, bacterial diversity and composition was studied in 30 latrines in Tanzania and Vietnam using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and correlated with a number of intrinsic environmental factors such as pH, temperature, organic matter content/composition and geographical factors. Clear differences were observed at the operational taxonomic unit, family and phylum level in terms of richness and community composition between latrines in Tanzania and Vietnam. The results also clearly show that environmental variables, particularly substrate type and availability, can exert a strong structuring influence on bacterial communities in latrines from both countries. The origins and significance of these environmental differences are discussed. This work describes the bacterial ecology of pit latrines in combination with inherent latrine characteristics at an unprecedented level of detail. As such, it provides useful baseline information for future studies that aim to understand the factors that affect decomposition rates in pit latrines.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-223
Number of pages15
JournalMicrobial Biotechnology
Volume9
Issue number2
Early online date15 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016

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Toilet Facilities
Ecology
Chemical analysis
Decomposition
Sanitation
Tanzania
Vietnam
Biological materials
Genes
Availability
Substrates
Intrinsic Factor
Systems Biology
rRNA Genes
Temperature

Cite this

Torondel, B., Ensink, J. H. J., Gundogdu, O., Ijaz, U. Z., Parkhill, J., Abdelahi, F., ... Quince, C. (2016). Assessment of the influence of intrinsic environmental and geographical factors on the bacterial ecology of pit latrines. Microbial Biotechnology, 9(2), 209-223. https://doi.org/10.1111/1751-7915.12334

Assessment of the influence of intrinsic environmental and geographical factors on the bacterial ecology of pit latrines. / Torondel, Belen; Ensink, Jeroen H. J.; Gundogdu, Ozan; Ijaz, Umer Zeeshan; Parkhill, Julian; Abdelahi, Faraji; Nguyen, Viet-Anh; Sudgen, Steven; Gibson, Walter; Walker, Alan W.; Quince, Christopher.

In: Microbial Biotechnology, Vol. 9, No. 2, 03.2016, p. 209-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Torondel, B, Ensink, JHJ, Gundogdu, O, Ijaz, UZ, Parkhill, J, Abdelahi, F, Nguyen, V-A, Sudgen, S, Gibson, W, Walker, AW & Quince, C 2016, 'Assessment of the influence of intrinsic environmental and geographical factors on the bacterial ecology of pit latrines' Microbial Biotechnology, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 209-223. https://doi.org/10.1111/1751-7915.12334
Torondel, Belen ; Ensink, Jeroen H. J. ; Gundogdu, Ozan ; Ijaz, Umer Zeeshan ; Parkhill, Julian ; Abdelahi, Faraji ; Nguyen, Viet-Anh ; Sudgen, Steven ; Gibson, Walter ; Walker, Alan W. ; Quince, Christopher. / Assessment of the influence of intrinsic environmental and geographical factors on the bacterial ecology of pit latrines. In: Microbial Biotechnology. 2016 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 209-223.
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