Association Between Hearing Impairment and Risk of Hospitalization in Older Adults

Dane J. Genther*, Joshua Betz, Sheila Pratt, Kathryn R. Martin, Tamara B. Harris, Suzanne Satterfield, Douglas C. Bauer, Anne B. Newman, Eleanor M. Simonsick, Frank R. Lin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives

To determine the association between hearing impairment (HI) and risk and duration of hospitalization in community-dwelling older adults in the United States.

Design

Prospective observational study.

Setting

Health, Aging and Body Composition Study.

Participants

Well-functioning community-dwelling white and black Medicare beneficiaries aged 70 to 79 at study enrollment in 1997-98 were followed for a median of 12years.

Measurements

Incidence, annual rate, and duration of hospitalization were the primary outcomes. Hearing was defined as the pure-tone average (PTA) of hearing thresholds in decibels re: hearing level (dB HL) at octave frequencies from 0.5 to 4.0kHz. Mild HI was defined as a PTA from 25 to 40dB HL, and moderate or greater HI was defined as a PTA greater than 40dB HL.

Results

Of the 2,148 participants included in the analysis, 1,801 (83.5%) experienced one or more hospitalizations, with 7,007 adjudicated hospitalization events occurring during the study period. Eight hundred eighty-two (41.1%) participants had normal hearing, 818 (38.1%) had mild HI, and 448 (20.9%) had moderate or greater HI. After adjusting for demographic characteristics and cardiovascular comorbidities, persons with mild HI experienced a 16% (hazard ratio (HR)=1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.04-1.29) greater risk of incident hospitalization and a 17% (incidence rate ratio (IRR)=1.17, 95% CI=1.04-1.32) greater annual rate of hospitalization, and those with moderate or greater HI experienced a 21% (HR=1.21, 95% CI=1.06-1.38) greater risk of incident hospitalization and a 19% (IRR=1.19, 95% CI=1.04-1.38) greater annual rate of hospitalization than persons with normal hearing. There was no significant association between HI and mean duration of hospitalization.

Conclusion

Hearing-impaired older adults experience a greater incidence and annual rate of hospitalization than those with normal hearing. Investigating whether rehabilitative therapies could affect the risk of hospitalization in older adults requires further study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1146-1152
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume63
Issue number6
Early online date11 Jun 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • hearing impairment
  • hospitalization
  • older adults
  • epidemiology
  • QUICK DIAGNOSIS UNITS
  • ELDER LIFE PROGRAM
  • HEALTH-CARE USE
  • INCIDENT DEMENTIA
  • BODY-COMPOSITION
  • SOCIAL-ISOLATION
  • AGE
  • STATES
  • DISEASE
  • ADMISSION

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Association Between Hearing Impairment and Risk of Hospitalization in Older Adults. / Genther, Dane J.; Betz, Joshua; Pratt, Sheila; Martin, Kathryn R.; Harris, Tamara B.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Bauer, Douglas C.; Newman, Anne B.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Lin, Frank R.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 63, No. 6, 2015, p. 1146-1152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Genther, DJ, Betz, J, Pratt, S, Martin, KR, Harris, TB, Satterfield, S, Bauer, DC, Newman, AB, Simonsick, EM & Lin, FR 2015, 'Association Between Hearing Impairment and Risk of Hospitalization in Older Adults', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 63, no. 6, pp. 1146-1152. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.13456
Genther, Dane J. ; Betz, Joshua ; Pratt, Sheila ; Martin, Kathryn R. ; Harris, Tamara B. ; Satterfield, Suzanne ; Bauer, Douglas C. ; Newman, Anne B. ; Simonsick, Eleanor M. ; Lin, Frank R. / Association Between Hearing Impairment and Risk of Hospitalization in Older Adults. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2015 ; Vol. 63, No. 6. pp. 1146-1152.
@article{bdc949f5702b4b9a8d89fd9c74848249,
title = "Association Between Hearing Impairment and Risk of Hospitalization in Older Adults",
abstract = "ObjectivesTo determine the association between hearing impairment (HI) and risk and duration of hospitalization in community-dwelling older adults in the United States.DesignProspective observational study.SettingHealth, Aging and Body Composition Study.ParticipantsWell-functioning community-dwelling white and black Medicare beneficiaries aged 70 to 79 at study enrollment in 1997-98 were followed for a median of 12years.MeasurementsIncidence, annual rate, and duration of hospitalization were the primary outcomes. Hearing was defined as the pure-tone average (PTA) of hearing thresholds in decibels re: hearing level (dB HL) at octave frequencies from 0.5 to 4.0kHz. Mild HI was defined as a PTA from 25 to 40dB HL, and moderate or greater HI was defined as a PTA greater than 40dB HL.ResultsOf the 2,148 participants included in the analysis, 1,801 (83.5{\%}) experienced one or more hospitalizations, with 7,007 adjudicated hospitalization events occurring during the study period. Eight hundred eighty-two (41.1{\%}) participants had normal hearing, 818 (38.1{\%}) had mild HI, and 448 (20.9{\%}) had moderate or greater HI. After adjusting for demographic characteristics and cardiovascular comorbidities, persons with mild HI experienced a 16{\%} (hazard ratio (HR)=1.16, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) =1.04-1.29) greater risk of incident hospitalization and a 17{\%} (incidence rate ratio (IRR)=1.17, 95{\%} CI=1.04-1.32) greater annual rate of hospitalization, and those with moderate or greater HI experienced a 21{\%} (HR=1.21, 95{\%} CI=1.06-1.38) greater risk of incident hospitalization and a 19{\%} (IRR=1.19, 95{\%} CI=1.04-1.38) greater annual rate of hospitalization than persons with normal hearing. There was no significant association between HI and mean duration of hospitalization.ConclusionHearing-impaired older adults experience a greater incidence and annual rate of hospitalization than those with normal hearing. Investigating whether rehabilitative therapies could affect the risk of hospitalization in older adults requires further study.",
keywords = "hearing impairment, hospitalization, older adults, epidemiology, QUICK DIAGNOSIS UNITS, ELDER LIFE PROGRAM, HEALTH-CARE USE, INCIDENT DEMENTIA, BODY-COMPOSITION, SOCIAL-ISOLATION, AGE, STATES, DISEASE, ADMISSION",
author = "Genther, {Dane J.} and Joshua Betz and Sheila Pratt and Martin, {Kathryn R.} and Harris, {Tamara B.} and Suzanne Satterfield and Bauer, {Douglas C.} and Newman, {Anne B.} and Simonsick, {Eleanor M.} and Lin, {Frank R.}",
note = "This research was supported by National Institute on Aging (NIA) Contracts N01-AG-6–2101, N01-AG-6–2103, N01-AG-6–2106; NIA Grant R01-AG028050; and National Institute of Nursing Research Grant R01-NR012459. This study was further supported in part by National Institutes of Health Grant T32DC000027, NIA grant K24AG031155, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant K23DC011279, Intramural Research Program of the NIA, Triological Society and American College of Surgeons through the Clinician Scientist Award, and Eleanor Schwartz Charitable Foundation. Dr. Pratt was supported in part with resources and the use of facilities at the Department of Veterans Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System, although the contents do not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. government. This work was presented as a poster display as part of the American Auditory Society Scientific and Technology Meeting, March 6–8, 2014, Scottsdale, Arizona.",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1111/jgs.13456",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "1146--1152",
journal = "Journal of the American Geriatrics Society",
issn = "0002-8614",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association Between Hearing Impairment and Risk of Hospitalization in Older Adults

AU - Genther, Dane J.

AU - Betz, Joshua

AU - Pratt, Sheila

AU - Martin, Kathryn R.

AU - Harris, Tamara B.

AU - Satterfield, Suzanne

AU - Bauer, Douglas C.

AU - Newman, Anne B.

AU - Simonsick, Eleanor M.

AU - Lin, Frank R.

N1 - This research was supported by National Institute on Aging (NIA) Contracts N01-AG-6–2101, N01-AG-6–2103, N01-AG-6–2106; NIA Grant R01-AG028050; and National Institute of Nursing Research Grant R01-NR012459. This study was further supported in part by National Institutes of Health Grant T32DC000027, NIA grant K24AG031155, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant K23DC011279, Intramural Research Program of the NIA, Triological Society and American College of Surgeons through the Clinician Scientist Award, and Eleanor Schwartz Charitable Foundation. Dr. Pratt was supported in part with resources and the use of facilities at the Department of Veterans Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System, although the contents do not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. government. This work was presented as a poster display as part of the American Auditory Society Scientific and Technology Meeting, March 6–8, 2014, Scottsdale, Arizona.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - ObjectivesTo determine the association between hearing impairment (HI) and risk and duration of hospitalization in community-dwelling older adults in the United States.DesignProspective observational study.SettingHealth, Aging and Body Composition Study.ParticipantsWell-functioning community-dwelling white and black Medicare beneficiaries aged 70 to 79 at study enrollment in 1997-98 were followed for a median of 12years.MeasurementsIncidence, annual rate, and duration of hospitalization were the primary outcomes. Hearing was defined as the pure-tone average (PTA) of hearing thresholds in decibels re: hearing level (dB HL) at octave frequencies from 0.5 to 4.0kHz. Mild HI was defined as a PTA from 25 to 40dB HL, and moderate or greater HI was defined as a PTA greater than 40dB HL.ResultsOf the 2,148 participants included in the analysis, 1,801 (83.5%) experienced one or more hospitalizations, with 7,007 adjudicated hospitalization events occurring during the study period. Eight hundred eighty-two (41.1%) participants had normal hearing, 818 (38.1%) had mild HI, and 448 (20.9%) had moderate or greater HI. After adjusting for demographic characteristics and cardiovascular comorbidities, persons with mild HI experienced a 16% (hazard ratio (HR)=1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.04-1.29) greater risk of incident hospitalization and a 17% (incidence rate ratio (IRR)=1.17, 95% CI=1.04-1.32) greater annual rate of hospitalization, and those with moderate or greater HI experienced a 21% (HR=1.21, 95% CI=1.06-1.38) greater risk of incident hospitalization and a 19% (IRR=1.19, 95% CI=1.04-1.38) greater annual rate of hospitalization than persons with normal hearing. There was no significant association between HI and mean duration of hospitalization.ConclusionHearing-impaired older adults experience a greater incidence and annual rate of hospitalization than those with normal hearing. Investigating whether rehabilitative therapies could affect the risk of hospitalization in older adults requires further study.

AB - ObjectivesTo determine the association between hearing impairment (HI) and risk and duration of hospitalization in community-dwelling older adults in the United States.DesignProspective observational study.SettingHealth, Aging and Body Composition Study.ParticipantsWell-functioning community-dwelling white and black Medicare beneficiaries aged 70 to 79 at study enrollment in 1997-98 were followed for a median of 12years.MeasurementsIncidence, annual rate, and duration of hospitalization were the primary outcomes. Hearing was defined as the pure-tone average (PTA) of hearing thresholds in decibels re: hearing level (dB HL) at octave frequencies from 0.5 to 4.0kHz. Mild HI was defined as a PTA from 25 to 40dB HL, and moderate or greater HI was defined as a PTA greater than 40dB HL.ResultsOf the 2,148 participants included in the analysis, 1,801 (83.5%) experienced one or more hospitalizations, with 7,007 adjudicated hospitalization events occurring during the study period. Eight hundred eighty-two (41.1%) participants had normal hearing, 818 (38.1%) had mild HI, and 448 (20.9%) had moderate or greater HI. After adjusting for demographic characteristics and cardiovascular comorbidities, persons with mild HI experienced a 16% (hazard ratio (HR)=1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.04-1.29) greater risk of incident hospitalization and a 17% (incidence rate ratio (IRR)=1.17, 95% CI=1.04-1.32) greater annual rate of hospitalization, and those with moderate or greater HI experienced a 21% (HR=1.21, 95% CI=1.06-1.38) greater risk of incident hospitalization and a 19% (IRR=1.19, 95% CI=1.04-1.38) greater annual rate of hospitalization than persons with normal hearing. There was no significant association between HI and mean duration of hospitalization.ConclusionHearing-impaired older adults experience a greater incidence and annual rate of hospitalization than those with normal hearing. Investigating whether rehabilitative therapies could affect the risk of hospitalization in older adults requires further study.

KW - hearing impairment

KW - hospitalization

KW - older adults

KW - epidemiology

KW - QUICK DIAGNOSIS UNITS

KW - ELDER LIFE PROGRAM

KW - HEALTH-CARE USE

KW - INCIDENT DEMENTIA

KW - BODY-COMPOSITION

KW - SOCIAL-ISOLATION

KW - AGE

KW - STATES

KW - DISEASE

KW - ADMISSION

U2 - 10.1111/jgs.13456

DO - 10.1111/jgs.13456

M3 - Article

VL - 63

SP - 1146

EP - 1152

JO - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

SN - 0002-8614

IS - 6

ER -