Association between mammalian lifesPan and circadian free-running period: The circadian resonance hypothesis revisited

C. A. Wyse, A. N. Coogan, C. Selman, D. G. Hazlerigg, J. R. Speakman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biological rhythms that oscillate with periods close to 24 h (circadian cycles) are pervasive features of mammalian physiology, facilitating entrainment to the 24 h cycle generated by the rotation of the Earth. In the absence of environmental time cues, circadian rhythms default to their endogenous period called tau, or the free- running period. This sustained circadian rhythmicity in constant conditions has been reported across the animal kingdom, a ubiquity that could imply that innate rhythmicity confers an adaptive advantage. In this study, we found that the deviation of tau from 24 h was inversely related to the lifesPan in laboratory mouse strains, and in other rodent and primate species. These findings support the hypothesis that misalignment of endogenous rhythms and 24 h environmental cycles may be associated with a physiological cost that has an effect on longevity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)696-698
Number of pages3
JournalBiology Letters
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Oct 2010

Keywords

  • Circadian
  • Free-running
  • LifesPan
  • Primate
  • Rodent
  • Tau

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Association between mammalian lifesPan and circadian free-running period: The circadian resonance hypothesis revisited'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this