Asthma-specific health related quality of life of people in Great Britain: A national survey

Jane Upton, Carine Lewis, Emily Humphreys, David Price, Samantha Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Although the ultimate goal of asthma treatment is to improve asthma-specific health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL), in the UK population this is insufficiently studied. National asthma-specific HRQOL data is needed to inform strategies to address this condition.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To benchmark asthma-specific HRQOL in a national survey of adults with asthma, and explore differences in this measure within subsections of the population Methods: We analysed answers to the Marks Asthma Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (AQLQ-M) from a representative sample of 658 adults with asthma. Respondents answered asthma-specific questions to assess control, previous hospital admissions, asthma attacks and an indicator of severity. Higher scores indicate poorer HRQOL (maximum = 60). The highest quintile formed a subgroup 'Poor HRQOL'. Data were weighted to correct for any biases caused by differential non-response. Chi square analyses were used to determine differences between good and poor quality of life and regression analyses performed to determine what factors are associated with poor HRQOL.

RESULTS: The response rate was 49%. AQLQ-M median (IQR) scores were 5 ( 2-13 ) for the total sample, (poor HRQOL = 21, good HRQOL = 3). Significant differences between good and poor HRQOL were observed in smoking status, SES, employment status and comorbidities, but no differences were found between age groups. Those with poorly controlled asthma were significantly more likely to have poor HRQOL, ≥1 breathing related hospital admission or ≥1 asthma attack.

CONCLUSIONS: This paper provides benchmarking data on asthma-specific HRQOL. Improved strategies are needed to target interventions towards people experiencing poor HRQOL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)975-982
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Asthma
Volume53
Issue number9
Early online date26 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Asthma
Quality of Life
Benchmarking
United Kingdom
Surveys and Questionnaires
Population
Comorbidity
Respiration
Age Groups
Smoking
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • asthma
  • cross-sectional survey
  • quality of life

Cite this

Asthma-specific health related quality of life of people in Great Britain : A national survey. / Upton, Jane; Lewis, Carine; Humphreys, Emily; Price, David; Walker, Samantha.

In: Journal of Asthma, Vol. 53, No. 9, 2016, p. 975-982.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Upton, Jane ; Lewis, Carine ; Humphreys, Emily ; Price, David ; Walker, Samantha. / Asthma-specific health related quality of life of people in Great Britain : A national survey. In: Journal of Asthma. 2016 ; Vol. 53, No. 9. pp. 975-982.
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N2 - INTRODUCTION: Although the ultimate goal of asthma treatment is to improve asthma-specific health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL), in the UK population this is insufficiently studied. National asthma-specific HRQOL data is needed to inform strategies to address this condition.AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To benchmark asthma-specific HRQOL in a national survey of adults with asthma, and explore differences in this measure within subsections of the population Methods: We analysed answers to the Marks Asthma Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (AQLQ-M) from a representative sample of 658 adults with asthma. Respondents answered asthma-specific questions to assess control, previous hospital admissions, asthma attacks and an indicator of severity. Higher scores indicate poorer HRQOL (maximum = 60). The highest quintile formed a subgroup 'Poor HRQOL'. Data were weighted to correct for any biases caused by differential non-response. Chi square analyses were used to determine differences between good and poor quality of life and regression analyses performed to determine what factors are associated with poor HRQOL.RESULTS: The response rate was 49%. AQLQ-M median (IQR) scores were 5 ( 2-13 ) for the total sample, (poor HRQOL = 21, good HRQOL = 3). Significant differences between good and poor HRQOL were observed in smoking status, SES, employment status and comorbidities, but no differences were found between age groups. Those with poorly controlled asthma were significantly more likely to have poor HRQOL, ≥1 breathing related hospital admission or ≥1 asthma attack.CONCLUSIONS: This paper provides benchmarking data on asthma-specific HRQOL. Improved strategies are needed to target interventions towards people experiencing poor HRQOL.

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