Attention induced motion blindness

Arash Sahraie, Maarten Valentijn Milders, M. Niedeggen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have shown evidence for modulation of cortical activity by attention in visual areas involved in motion processing. Behavioural effects of this modulation have only been reported for high-order, but not for luminance-based motion. We show that attentional load can even affect the perception of a first-order motion inducing a short-termed motion blindness. The detection of transient coherent motion embedded in a rapid serial visual presentation was severely impaired if colour features were to be processed simultaneously. The findings reported here show attentional requirements can affect motion perception. This effect can not be explained by motion adaptation or priming and may instead arise from the suppression of irrelevant stimuli. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1613-1617
Number of pages4
JournalVision Research
Volume41
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2001

Keywords

  • VISUAL-MOTION
  • MODULATION
  • PERCEPTION
  • BLINK
  • MST
  • MT

Cite this

Attention induced motion blindness. / Sahraie, Arash; Milders, Maarten Valentijn; Niedeggen, M.

In: Vision Research, Vol. 41, No. 13, 06.2001, p. 1613-1617.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sahraie, A, Milders, MV & Niedeggen, M 2001, 'Attention induced motion blindness', Vision Research, vol. 41, no. 13, pp. 1613-1617. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0042-6989(01)00065-7
Sahraie, Arash ; Milders, Maarten Valentijn ; Niedeggen, M. / Attention induced motion blindness. In: Vision Research. 2001 ; Vol. 41, No. 13. pp. 1613-1617.
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