Aviat: a Lower Pleistocene shallow gas hazard developed as a fuel gas supply for the Forties Field

Phil Rose, Grant Byerley, Owen Vaughan, John Cater, Brice R. Rea, Matteo Spagnolo, Stuart Archer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The search for a gas source near to Apache's Forties Field in the North Sea was motivated by the prediction of an ever-increasing fuel gas shortfall as the field oil rate declined. The Central North Sea is well known for a large number of shallow gas hazards in the Pleistocene section that have historically caused blowouts during exploration and development. These gas accumulations typically show up as small bright anomalies on seismic data. In 2009, a large gas anomaly was identified to the east of Forties, and the Aviat Field was discovered in 2010 when exploration well 22/7-5 was drilled.

The Aviat Field reservoir is interpreted to be a subaqueous glacial outwash fan, consisting of silt-grade, rock flour material, deposited in front of a grounded ice sheet in some 400 m of water. Aviat sits on an overcompacted silty mudstone that was deformed by this ice sheet – the Crenulate Marker. The distribution of this horizon implies that the Early Pleistocene ice sheet covered at least the northern half of the UK North Sea.

Although the Aviat reservoir is thin (2–9 m thick), the well tests, pressure profiles and geophysical response demonstrate that the reservoir is well connected, extensive (over 35 km2) with high deliverability (up to 18 MMscfd achieved). Aviat was sanctioned in 2014 for development as a fuel gas supply for the Forties Field, with first gas achieved in July 2016.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPetroleum Geology of NW Europe
Subtitle of host publication50 Years of Learning – Proceedings of the 8th Petroleum Geology Conference
EditorsM Bowman, B Levell
Place of PublicationBath
PublisherGeological Society of London
Pages485-505
Number of pages21
Volume8
ISBN (Print)978-1-78620-277-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Event8th Petroleum Geology Conference - Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London, United Kingdom
Duration: 28 Sep 201530 Sep 2015

Publication series

NamePetroleum Geology Conference series
PublisherGeological Society, London
Volume8
ISSN (Print)2047-9921

Conference

Conference8th Petroleum Geology Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period28/09/1530/09/15

Fingerprint

gas supply
hazard
Pleistocene
gas
ice sheet
anomaly
well
outwash
oil field
mudstone
seismic data
silt
prediction
rock
sea

Cite this

Rose, P., Byerley, G., Vaughan, O., Cater, J., Rea, B. R., Spagnolo, M., & Archer, S. (2018). Aviat: a Lower Pleistocene shallow gas hazard developed as a fuel gas supply for the Forties Field. In M. Bowman, & B. Levell (Eds.), Petroleum Geology of NW Europe: 50 Years of Learning – Proceedings of the 8th Petroleum Geology Conference (Vol. 8, pp. 485-505). (Petroleum Geology Conference series; Vol. 8). Bath: Geological Society of London. https://doi.org/10.1144/PGC8.16

Aviat : a Lower Pleistocene shallow gas hazard developed as a fuel gas supply for the Forties Field. / Rose, Phil; Byerley, Grant; Vaughan, Owen; Cater, John; Rea, Brice R.; Spagnolo, Matteo; Archer, Stuart.

Petroleum Geology of NW Europe: 50 Years of Learning – Proceedings of the 8th Petroleum Geology Conference. ed. / M Bowman; B Levell. Vol. 8 Bath : Geological Society of London, 2018. p. 485-505 (Petroleum Geology Conference series; Vol. 8).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Rose, P, Byerley, G, Vaughan, O, Cater, J, Rea, BR, Spagnolo, M & Archer, S 2018, Aviat: a Lower Pleistocene shallow gas hazard developed as a fuel gas supply for the Forties Field. in M Bowman & B Levell (eds), Petroleum Geology of NW Europe: 50 Years of Learning – Proceedings of the 8th Petroleum Geology Conference. vol. 8, Petroleum Geology Conference series, vol. 8, Geological Society of London, Bath, pp. 485-505, 8th Petroleum Geology Conference, London, United Kingdom, 28/09/15. https://doi.org/10.1144/PGC8.16
Rose P, Byerley G, Vaughan O, Cater J, Rea BR, Spagnolo M et al. Aviat: a Lower Pleistocene shallow gas hazard developed as a fuel gas supply for the Forties Field. In Bowman M, Levell B, editors, Petroleum Geology of NW Europe: 50 Years of Learning – Proceedings of the 8th Petroleum Geology Conference. Vol. 8. Bath: Geological Society of London. 2018. p. 485-505. (Petroleum Geology Conference series). https://doi.org/10.1144/PGC8.16
Rose, Phil ; Byerley, Grant ; Vaughan, Owen ; Cater, John ; Rea, Brice R. ; Spagnolo, Matteo ; Archer, Stuart. / Aviat : a Lower Pleistocene shallow gas hazard developed as a fuel gas supply for the Forties Field. Petroleum Geology of NW Europe: 50 Years of Learning – Proceedings of the 8th Petroleum Geology Conference. editor / M Bowman ; B Levell. Vol. 8 Bath : Geological Society of London, 2018. pp. 485-505 (Petroleum Geology Conference series).
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abstract = "The search for a gas source near to Apache's Forties Field in the North Sea was motivated by the prediction of an ever-increasing fuel gas shortfall as the field oil rate declined. The Central North Sea is well known for a large number of shallow gas hazards in the Pleistocene section that have historically caused blowouts during exploration and development. These gas accumulations typically show up as small bright anomalies on seismic data. In 2009, a large gas anomaly was identified to the east of Forties, and the Aviat Field was discovered in 2010 when exploration well 22/7-5 was drilled.The Aviat Field reservoir is interpreted to be a subaqueous glacial outwash fan, consisting of silt-grade, rock flour material, deposited in front of a grounded ice sheet in some 400 m of water. Aviat sits on an overcompacted silty mudstone that was deformed by this ice sheet – the Crenulate Marker. The distribution of this horizon implies that the Early Pleistocene ice sheet covered at least the northern half of the UK North Sea.Although the Aviat reservoir is thin (2–9 m thick), the well tests, pressure profiles and geophysical response demonstrate that the reservoir is well connected, extensive (over 35 km2) with high deliverability (up to 18 MMscfd achieved). Aviat was sanctioned in 2014 for development as a fuel gas supply for the Forties Field, with first gas achieved in July 2016.",
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