B-type natriuretic peptide and the prediction of outcome in patients admitted to intensive care

Brian Cuthbertson, R. R. Patel, Bernard Lewis Croal, Justin Lee Barclay, Graham Scott Hillis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    42 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    B-type natriuretic peptide is known to predict outcome in congestive cardiac failure and myocardial infarction. We aimed to determine whether measurement of B-type natriuretic peptide would predict hospital mortality in patients admitted to an intensive care unit. We conducted a prospective observational cohort study in 78 consecutive patients. Demographics, clinical details and clinical outcomes were recorded. Admission and 24 h B-type natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin I levels were measured. B-type natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin I levels taken on intensive care admission and 24 h after admission did not accurately predict hospital mortality for all patients, including patients with severe sepsis or septic shock (all p > 0.05). B-type natriuretic peptide levels were higher in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock (p = 0.02), in patients greater than or equal to 65 years (p = 0.04) and in patients with raised creatinine greater than or equal to 110 mumol.l(-1) (p = 0.02). We concluded that B-type natriuretic peptide, measured soon after admission to intensive care, does not usefully predict outcome after intensive care.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)16-21
    Number of pages5
    JournalAnaesthesia
    Volume60
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Keywords

    • CRITICALLY-ILL PATIENTS
    • LEFT-VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION
    • SEPTIC SHOCK
    • HEART-FAILURE
    • CARDIAC DYSFUNCTION
    • EMERGENCY DIAGNOSIS
    • UNIT PATIENTS
    • PLASMA
    • BNP
    • MORTALITY

    Cite this

    Cuthbertson, B., Patel, R. R., Croal, B. L., Barclay, J. L., & Hillis, G. S. (2005). B-type natriuretic peptide and the prediction of outcome in patients admitted to intensive care. Anaesthesia, 60(1), 16-21. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2044.2004.03972.x

    B-type natriuretic peptide and the prediction of outcome in patients admitted to intensive care. / Cuthbertson, Brian; Patel, R. R.; Croal, Bernard Lewis; Barclay, Justin Lee; Hillis, Graham Scott.

    In: Anaesthesia, Vol. 60, No. 1, 2005, p. 16-21.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Cuthbertson, Brian ; Patel, R. R. ; Croal, Bernard Lewis ; Barclay, Justin Lee ; Hillis, Graham Scott. / B-type natriuretic peptide and the prediction of outcome in patients admitted to intensive care. In: Anaesthesia. 2005 ; Vol. 60, No. 1. pp. 16-21.
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