Basking sharks travel in extended families with their own ‘gourmet maps’ of feeding spots, genetic tagging reveals

Catherine Jones, Noble Leslie, Lilian Lieber

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

Picture the scene. Swimming off Scotland’s west coast during a summer holiday you notice a large dark shark nearly 10 metres long headed towards you. A prominent triangular dorsal fin cuts the surface, the powerful rhythmically beating tail driving it silently through the cloudy green depths. You’re transfixed by a cavernous mouth large enough to swallow a seal.
Original languageEnglish
Specialist publicationThe Conversation
PublisherThe Conversation UK
Publication statusPublished - 4 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Marine conservation
  • Basking sharks
  • Marine biodiversity

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