Becoming a Multilingual Researcher in Contemporary Academic Culture: Experiential Stories of (Not) Learning and Using Languages

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

This chapter reflects on social science researchers’ narratives of learning and using languages. Through these accounts, the chapter identifies how notions of proficiency and fluency in the competent multilingual researcher are often conceptualised through a set of exclusionary value paradigms, rooted in forms of social inequality. The chapter grounds this in the contemporary academic context of neoliberal competition, and in doing so, demonstrates the intellectual, professional, and emotional risks and vulnerabilities involved in using languages in research. Based on this, the chapter suggests that ‘breaking the silence’also involves ‘breaking the culture’of a hegemonic value system which underpins the academic field.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLearning and Using Languages in Ethnographic Fieldwork
EditorsRobert Gibb, Annabel Tremlett, Julien Danero Iglesias
Place of PublicationBristol
PublisherMultiLingual Matters
Chapter16
Pages207-220
ISBN (Print)9781788925914
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Oct 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Becoming a Multilingual Researcher in Contemporary Academic Culture: Experiential Stories of (Not) Learning and Using Languages'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this