Behavioural responses to structures on the seafloor by the deep-sea fish Coryphaenoides armatus: Implications for the use of baited landers

Alan John Jamieson, David Mark Bailey, H. -. J. Wagner, Philip Michael Bagley, Imants George Priede

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coryphaenoides armatus plays a fundamental role in the dispersal of organic matter on the deep-sea floor by consuming food-falls. The use of baited cameras to study population parameters (e.g. abundances and size frequencies) assumes that members of this species follow odour plumes directly to bait, appear immediately in the field of view, and depart as predicted by optimal foraging theory. Described here are behaviours to the contrary observed during the operation and development of more complex baited camera systems. Of the 247 C armatus observed by a video lander, 72.5% of the fish explored the structure whilst only 6% fed, and 21.5% were indifferent. This exploratory behaviour increased individual staying time by 38.4% compared to those that just fed. Experiments with several models of in situ fish respirometry lander showed the importance of both equipment design, and an understanding of the behaviour of the target animals in maximising capture success. These results show how previously unexpected aspects of behaviour by C armatus can greatly affect the chances of capturing members of this species and influence the results of baited camera experiments. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1157-1166
Number of pages9
JournalDeep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers
Volume53
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • deep-sea fish
  • fish behaviour
  • underwater structures
  • baited cameras
  • NE Atlantic
  • NORTHEAST ATLANTIC-OCEAN
  • DEMERSAL FISHES
  • IN-SITU
  • PORCUPINE SEABIGHT
  • FREE VEHICLE
  • FOOD FALLS
  • CONSUMPTION
  • DISPERSAL
  • ABUNDANCE
  • TRACKING

Cite this

Behavioural responses to structures on the seafloor by the deep-sea fish Coryphaenoides armatus: Implications for the use of baited landers. / Jamieson, Alan John; Bailey, David Mark; Wagner, H. -. J.; Bagley, Philip Michael; Priede, Imants George.

In: Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers, Vol. 53, 2006, p. 1157-1166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jamieson, Alan John ; Bailey, David Mark ; Wagner, H. -. J. ; Bagley, Philip Michael ; Priede, Imants George. / Behavioural responses to structures on the seafloor by the deep-sea fish Coryphaenoides armatus: Implications for the use of baited landers. In: Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers. 2006 ; Vol. 53. pp. 1157-1166.
@article{61ddaa9f23f84a0e83e45ae5706c0cfa,
title = "Behavioural responses to structures on the seafloor by the deep-sea fish Coryphaenoides armatus: Implications for the use of baited landers",
abstract = "Coryphaenoides armatus plays a fundamental role in the dispersal of organic matter on the deep-sea floor by consuming food-falls. The use of baited cameras to study population parameters (e.g. abundances and size frequencies) assumes that members of this species follow odour plumes directly to bait, appear immediately in the field of view, and depart as predicted by optimal foraging theory. Described here are behaviours to the contrary observed during the operation and development of more complex baited camera systems. Of the 247 C armatus observed by a video lander, 72.5{\%} of the fish explored the structure whilst only 6{\%} fed, and 21.5{\%} were indifferent. This exploratory behaviour increased individual staying time by 38.4{\%} compared to those that just fed. Experiments with several models of in situ fish respirometry lander showed the importance of both equipment design, and an understanding of the behaviour of the target animals in maximising capture success. These results show how previously unexpected aspects of behaviour by C armatus can greatly affect the chances of capturing members of this species and influence the results of baited camera experiments. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "deep-sea fish, fish behaviour, underwater structures, baited cameras, NE Atlantic, NORTHEAST ATLANTIC-OCEAN, DEMERSAL FISHES, IN-SITU, PORCUPINE SEABIGHT, FREE VEHICLE, FOOD FALLS, CONSUMPTION, DISPERSAL, ABUNDANCE, TRACKING",
author = "Jamieson, {Alan John} and Bailey, {David Mark} and Wagner, {H. -. J.} and Bagley, {Philip Michael} and Priede, {Imants George}",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1016/j.dsr.2006.04.002",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "1157--1166",
journal = "Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers",
issn = "0967-0637",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Behavioural responses to structures on the seafloor by the deep-sea fish Coryphaenoides armatus: Implications for the use of baited landers

AU - Jamieson, Alan John

AU - Bailey, David Mark

AU - Wagner, H. -. J.

AU - Bagley, Philip Michael

AU - Priede, Imants George

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Coryphaenoides armatus plays a fundamental role in the dispersal of organic matter on the deep-sea floor by consuming food-falls. The use of baited cameras to study population parameters (e.g. abundances and size frequencies) assumes that members of this species follow odour plumes directly to bait, appear immediately in the field of view, and depart as predicted by optimal foraging theory. Described here are behaviours to the contrary observed during the operation and development of more complex baited camera systems. Of the 247 C armatus observed by a video lander, 72.5% of the fish explored the structure whilst only 6% fed, and 21.5% were indifferent. This exploratory behaviour increased individual staying time by 38.4% compared to those that just fed. Experiments with several models of in situ fish respirometry lander showed the importance of both equipment design, and an understanding of the behaviour of the target animals in maximising capture success. These results show how previously unexpected aspects of behaviour by C armatus can greatly affect the chances of capturing members of this species and influence the results of baited camera experiments. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Coryphaenoides armatus plays a fundamental role in the dispersal of organic matter on the deep-sea floor by consuming food-falls. The use of baited cameras to study population parameters (e.g. abundances and size frequencies) assumes that members of this species follow odour plumes directly to bait, appear immediately in the field of view, and depart as predicted by optimal foraging theory. Described here are behaviours to the contrary observed during the operation and development of more complex baited camera systems. Of the 247 C armatus observed by a video lander, 72.5% of the fish explored the structure whilst only 6% fed, and 21.5% were indifferent. This exploratory behaviour increased individual staying time by 38.4% compared to those that just fed. Experiments with several models of in situ fish respirometry lander showed the importance of both equipment design, and an understanding of the behaviour of the target animals in maximising capture success. These results show how previously unexpected aspects of behaviour by C armatus can greatly affect the chances of capturing members of this species and influence the results of baited camera experiments. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - deep-sea fish

KW - fish behaviour

KW - underwater structures

KW - baited cameras

KW - NE Atlantic

KW - NORTHEAST ATLANTIC-OCEAN

KW - DEMERSAL FISHES

KW - IN-SITU

KW - PORCUPINE SEABIGHT

KW - FREE VEHICLE

KW - FOOD FALLS

KW - CONSUMPTION

KW - DISPERSAL

KW - ABUNDANCE

KW - TRACKING

U2 - 10.1016/j.dsr.2006.04.002

DO - 10.1016/j.dsr.2006.04.002

M3 - Article

VL - 53

SP - 1157

EP - 1166

JO - Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers

JF - Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers

SN - 0967-0637

ER -