Biological Concepts for the Control of Aquatic Zoosporic Diseases

Thijs Frenken (Corresponding Author), Ramsy Agha, Dirk S. Schmeller, Pieter van West, Justyna Wolinska

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aquatic zoosporic diseases are threatening global biodiversity and ecosystem
services, as well as economic activities. Current means of controlling zoosporic
diseases are restricted primarily to chemical treatments, which are usually harmful
or likely to be ineffective in the long term. Furthermore, some of these chemicals
have been banned due to adverse effects. As a result, there is a need for alternative methods with minimal side-effects on the ecosystem or environment. Here,
we integrate existing knowledge of three poorly interconnected areas of disease
research – amphibian conservation, aquaculture, and plankton ecology – and
arrange it into seven biological concepts to control zoosporic diseases. These
strategies may be less harmful and more sustainable than chemical approaches.
However, more research is needed before safe application is possible.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-582
Number of pages12
JournalTrends in Parasitology
Volume35
Issue number7
Early online date7 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

Plankton
Aquaculture
Biodiversity
Amphibians
Ecology
Ecosystem
Economics
Research

Keywords

  • aquaculture
  • biodiversity
  • chytrid
  • oomycete
  • pathogen
  • plankton

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Parasitology

Cite this

Biological Concepts for the Control of Aquatic Zoosporic Diseases. / Frenken, Thijs (Corresponding Author); Agha, Ramsy; Schmeller, Dirk S.; van West, Pieter; Wolinska, Justyna.

In: Trends in Parasitology, Vol. 35, No. 7, 01.07.2019, p. 571-582.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Frenken, Thijs ; Agha, Ramsy ; Schmeller, Dirk S. ; van West, Pieter ; Wolinska, Justyna. / Biological Concepts for the Control of Aquatic Zoosporic Diseases. In: Trends in Parasitology. 2019 ; Vol. 35, No. 7. pp. 571-582.
@article{d04bdfd2ee6543f692107ee1e6992ef1,
title = "Biological Concepts for the Control of Aquatic Zoosporic Diseases",
abstract = "Aquatic zoosporic diseases are threatening global biodiversity and ecosystemservices, as well as economic activities. Current means of controlling zoosporicdiseases are restricted primarily to chemical treatments, which are usually harmfulor likely to be ineffective in the long term. Furthermore, some of these chemicalshave been banned due to adverse effects. As a result, there is a need for alternative methods with minimal side-effects on the ecosystem or environment. Here,we integrate existing knowledge of three poorly interconnected areas of diseaseresearch – amphibian conservation, aquaculture, and plankton ecology – andarrange it into seven biological concepts to control zoosporic diseases. Thesestrategies may be less harmful and more sustainable than chemical approaches.However, more research is needed before safe application is possible.",
keywords = "aquaculture, biodiversity, chytrid, oomycete, pathogen, plankton",
author = "Thijs Frenken and Ramsy Agha and Schmeller, {Dirk S.} and {van West}, Pieter and Justyna Wolinska",
note = "Acknowledgments This research was supported by the International IGB Fellowship Program ‘Freshwater Science’ of the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB, Berlin) to T.F. and by the project People, Pollution, and Pathogens financed through the call ‘Mountains as Sentinels of Change’ by the Belmont Forum (ANR-15-MASC-0001 - P3, DFG-SCHM 3059/6-1, NERC-1633948, NSFC-41661144004) to D.S.S. and funding from the BBSRC and the NERC to P.v.W. The authors would like to thank Mark Phillipo for proofreading the manuscript.",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.pt.2019.04.003",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "571--582",
journal = "Trends in Parasitology",
issn = "1471-4922",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biological Concepts for the Control of Aquatic Zoosporic Diseases

AU - Frenken, Thijs

AU - Agha, Ramsy

AU - Schmeller, Dirk S.

AU - van West, Pieter

AU - Wolinska, Justyna

N1 - Acknowledgments This research was supported by the International IGB Fellowship Program ‘Freshwater Science’ of the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB, Berlin) to T.F. and by the project People, Pollution, and Pathogens financed through the call ‘Mountains as Sentinels of Change’ by the Belmont Forum (ANR-15-MASC-0001 - P3, DFG-SCHM 3059/6-1, NERC-1633948, NSFC-41661144004) to D.S.S. and funding from the BBSRC and the NERC to P.v.W. The authors would like to thank Mark Phillipo for proofreading the manuscript.

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Aquatic zoosporic diseases are threatening global biodiversity and ecosystemservices, as well as economic activities. Current means of controlling zoosporicdiseases are restricted primarily to chemical treatments, which are usually harmfulor likely to be ineffective in the long term. Furthermore, some of these chemicalshave been banned due to adverse effects. As a result, there is a need for alternative methods with minimal side-effects on the ecosystem or environment. Here,we integrate existing knowledge of three poorly interconnected areas of diseaseresearch – amphibian conservation, aquaculture, and plankton ecology – andarrange it into seven biological concepts to control zoosporic diseases. Thesestrategies may be less harmful and more sustainable than chemical approaches.However, more research is needed before safe application is possible.

AB - Aquatic zoosporic diseases are threatening global biodiversity and ecosystemservices, as well as economic activities. Current means of controlling zoosporicdiseases are restricted primarily to chemical treatments, which are usually harmfulor likely to be ineffective in the long term. Furthermore, some of these chemicalshave been banned due to adverse effects. As a result, there is a need for alternative methods with minimal side-effects on the ecosystem or environment. Here,we integrate existing knowledge of three poorly interconnected areas of diseaseresearch – amphibian conservation, aquaculture, and plankton ecology – andarrange it into seven biological concepts to control zoosporic diseases. Thesestrategies may be less harmful and more sustainable than chemical approaches.However, more research is needed before safe application is possible.

KW - aquaculture

KW - biodiversity

KW - chytrid

KW - oomycete

KW - pathogen

KW - plankton

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065138090&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/biological-concepts-control-aquatic-zoosporic-diseases

U2 - 10.1016/j.pt.2019.04.003

DO - 10.1016/j.pt.2019.04.003

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 571

EP - 582

JO - Trends in Parasitology

JF - Trends in Parasitology

SN - 1471-4922

IS - 7

ER -