Body mass and sex-biased parasitism in wood mice Apodemus sylvaticus

A. Harrison, M. Scantlebury, W. I. Montgomery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Male sex-biased parasitism (SBP) occurs across a range of mammalian taxa and two contrasting sets of hypotheses have been suggested for its establishment. The first invokes body size per se and suggests that larger individuals are either a larger target for parasites, trade off growth at the expense of immunity or cope better with parasitism than smaller individuals. The second suggests a sex-specific handicap whereby males have reduced immunocompetence compared to females due to the immunodepressive effects of testosterone. The current study investigated whether sex-biased parasitism is driven by host ‘body size’ or ‘sex’ using a rodent–tick (Apodemus sylvaticus–Ixodes ricinus) system. Moreover, the presence or absence of large mammals at study sites were used to control the presence of immature ticks infesting wood mice, allowing the impacts of parasitism on host body mass and female reproduction to be assessed. As expected, male mice had greater tick loads than females and analyses suggested this sex-bias was driven by body mass as opposed to sex. It is therefore likely that larger individuals are a larger target for parasites, trade off growth at the expense of immunity or adapt behavioural responses to parasitism based on their body size. Parasite load had no effect on host body mass or female reproductive output suggesting individuals may alter behaviour or life history strategies to compensate for costs incurred through parasitism. Overall, this study lends support to the ‘body size’ hypothesis for the formation of sex-biased parasitism.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1099-1104
Number of pages6
JournalOikos
Volume119
Issue number7
Early online date21 Jan 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

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Apodemus sylvaticus
Apodemus
parasitism
body mass
gender
body size
tick
immunity
trade-off
ticks
parasite
Ricinus
immunocompetence
parasite intensity
parasites
parasite load
testosterone
behavioral response
reproductive performance
life history

Cite this

Harrison, A., Scantlebury, M., & Montgomery, W. I. (2010). Body mass and sex-biased parasitism in wood mice Apodemus sylvaticus. Oikos, 119(7), 1099-1104. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0706.2009.18072.x

Body mass and sex-biased parasitism in wood mice Apodemus sylvaticus. / Harrison, A. ; Scantlebury, M.; Montgomery, W. I.

In: Oikos, Vol. 119, No. 7, 07.2010, p. 1099-1104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harrison, A, Scantlebury, M & Montgomery, WI 2010, 'Body mass and sex-biased parasitism in wood mice Apodemus sylvaticus', Oikos, vol. 119, no. 7, pp. 1099-1104. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0706.2009.18072.x
Harrison, A. ; Scantlebury, M. ; Montgomery, W. I. / Body mass and sex-biased parasitism in wood mice Apodemus sylvaticus. In: Oikos. 2010 ; Vol. 119, No. 7. pp. 1099-1104.
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